About us

Message from CEO


Jabel Oil Services (JOS) takes the opportunity to extend our greetings to all your good selves and to express our best wishes for the success of your operation in LIBYA.

Jabel Oil Services (JOS) is a private Libyan Company established almost twenty (20) years ago whose primary aim is to engage in Engineering, Construction, Technical Manpower Services, Maintenance & Repair in Oil Refineries, Storage Facilities and Petrochemical Plants. Our company intends to provide oil field support and services to the national and international Oil Companies in exploration and production activities.

The company started with the philosophy of starting and completing the projects in accordance with International Standards & Specifications to the satisfaction of our valued clients. This philosophy has been maintained since the establishment of the company that earned for itself the trust and confidence of our clients.

To maintain credibility and trust with our clients, we engaged the services of our fully experienced Engineers, Supervisors and Craftsmen who will ensure the highest standards of performance in every aspect of our project and maintain work quality in accordance with international Standards and practices.

We are greatly proud of presenting our prequalification statements and we hope that we could establish with our good selves a better working relations and cooperation in the near future.

Ragab el borgi
Chairman

Our Strategic Statements


Our Vision Our Mission Our Values

Our Vision

You Dream; We Build, Operate and Maintain.

We envision Jabel Oil Services to expand capabilities in Engineering, Procurement, Construction, Operation and Maintenance worldwide. If it has to be built, operated, and maintained, we at Jabel Oil Services will work it for you.

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Our Mission

Jabel Oil Services (JOS) is the World Partner in Engineering, Procurement, Construction, Operation and Maintenance.

On our mission, Jabel Oil Services searched people worldwide to provide clients with experienced specialists. Jabel Oil Services ensure that workers perform at highest industrial safety and quality standards.

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Our Values

We value the philosophy of starting and completing projects on time and on budget with highest standards in safety and quality for the satisfaction of our valued clients.

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Our Profile (12MB)

Our Services

Jabel Oil Services (JOS) undertakes Construction Works, Maintenance / Repair, Rehabilitation and revamping Works for Oil & Gas Fields, including Engineering Design & Materials Procurement Services as well as Technical Manpower Services to clients. With the philosophy of completing the projects and supplying Technical Manpower Services to meet client's satisfaction, Jabel Oil Services (JOS) continues to be trusted by its clients.

Training Course

Construction, Testing and commissioning for Oil & Gas Field facilities including pipelines, trunk lines, process piping...

General Training Courses for Oil & Gas Industries


Our vision

JOS Training department’s vision is to be a regional leader in providing professional training and development courses for Oil & Gas Industries.

Our Mission

JOS mission is to build competent professionals for Oil & Gas Industries by delivering learning and development base on industrial proven experience and contemporary knowledge.

Our Objectives

JOS considers sale as the essential component for the success of our company, that’s why we define our objectives to achieve our strategic goals by:

  • To ensure that the skills, ability and potential of all our trainers developed and up to date.
  • To continually improve the quality of human resources through continuous training & development based on industry proven experience and contemporary knowledge to support Oil & Gas industries.
  • To support our staff to develop their skills and abilities and reach their potential and in doing so improve the effectiveness of the organization and the quality of the service we provide.
Overview
JOS offers wide range of Training Courses

From processing to pipeline, engineering to operations, JOS has proven industry experience to help manage the talent required to execute on your midstream assets. As a trusted advisor and emerging leader in the industry, we can help you tackle your operational challenges by improving your workforce.JOS can provide the highest quality, business relevant programs that span all technical processes, and give management assurance that they have the skilled people they need to maximize asset value. It offer added value to employees via new, broad-reaching courses that fill gaps, and deliver the ability to perform and be able to prove it. JOS has processes, tools, and people to create a holistic workforce development plan for your engineers, operators, and technicians. It offers industry approved course material delivered through instructor led training modules. with a strong and proven petroleum industry’s knowledge our experts will work with you to develop structured accelerated learning programs for your organization. 

JOS is willing to provide broader, deeper and more flexible solutions in the development and assurance of competent personnel. JOS has affiliations with leading Training & Development Services providers in the industry. It can offer broad range of professional courses tailored for petroleum industry professionals. Proceeding pages provide summarized details of wide range of some training courses which JOS can offer to improve productivity of your organization by improving your professional workforce. Based on industry’s growing needs, JOS can offer new courses or custom tailored solutions for your speicifc professional needs. 

JOS offers training for 5-15 participants per training course in English Language. Training duration of our General Courses is between durations of 16, 26 and 39 weeks.

Click on following desired training course to reveal its content:

01) Management Skills Courses
Essential Leadership Skills for Technical Professionals

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

In the oil and gas industry, skillful and competent leadership is extremely important for safety, productivity and asset management. The 21st century brings new emphasis on leaders, new communication technologies, increased focus on safety, information overload, workforce dynamics, asset integrity and many other concerns which challenge even the most proficient leader/manager. This course will help you unleash natural motivation in your team. Your stress level can be lowered by working more efficiently and effectively by tapping the emotional intelligence of your team and co-workers.

Who Should Attend

Supervisors, Team Leads, Managers and others interested in becoming a better leader and a contributing team member will greatly benefit from this one week experience. 


Essential Technical Writing Skills

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Writing for work-related purposes ought to be brief, clear, informative and above all, readable. In this practical hands-on course, you gain a solid foundation in technical writing skills. 

Who Should Attend

All engineers, managers, IT/computer support staff, team leaders, supervisors and individuals responsible for writing letters, memos, reports, procedures, test results, and proposals that are clear, concise, and professional.


Negotiating Skills for the Petroleum Industry

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course helps you to develop strong interpersonal skills in the art and science of negotiation. You will learn to apply these skills to complex organizational issues and individual needs. Various tools and techniques are used to negotiate differences and disagreements to produce positive results. 

Who Should Attend

Petroleum industry personnel who are responsible for negotiating the best possible terms of an agreement in public and private sectors and those negotiating resources and deliverables in projects and programs.


Team Building for Intact Teams

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is most effective when attended by an entire team. Team members will develop and refine the skills essential for high performance teams. Emphasis is placed on learning more effective ways to enhance total team functionality and maximum team productivity. Individual communication styles will be assessed and examined to identify the most appropriate uses of team strengths. This course has been constructed to maximize opportunity for intact teams to strengthen team performance and team productivity.

Who Should Attend

Any intact team interested in becoming a stronger and more productive team such as project teams, leadership teams, cross-functional teams, production teams, quality improvement teams, etc.


Team Leadership

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This program will develop and refine the skills essential for leading a high performance team. Emphasis is placed on the leader’s role in effectively enhancing total team functionality and maximum team productivity. Individual communication styles will be assessed and examined to identify the most appropriate communication style to use with your team. This will be an active experience. In addition to receiving individual assessment information, participants will be exposed to team concepts, theories and skill development through various methods.

Who Should Attend

Team leaders, supervisors, managers and others responsible for leading a team.


Presentation Skills for Petroleum Industry

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Technical personnel often find it difficult to clearly express thoughts and ideas to others, especially when asked to report findings to - or request project expenditure authorization from - senior management. This course is for individuals who are required, as part of their jobs, to make presentations in-house or in public, and who need, therefore, to perfect the fundamentals of dynamic presentation-making. 

Who Should Attend

Industry personnel who wish to acquire the skills and techniques needed to design and deliver technical material clearly and confidently.


Making Change Happen: People and Process

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Attendees will work in teams to overcome the problems encountered when making changes in their organizations. You will also learn how to develop the ability to effectively handle organizational changes by examining the eight-step change process and understanding your own, and others, needs and responses to each step in the change process. A group workshop allows attendees to engage in, comment on, and improve their competencies in managing change.

Who Should Attend

All managers, team leaders, supervisors and individuals responsible for ensuring change is implemented successfully.


Meeting Management and Facilitation for the Petroleum Industry

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Meetings remain a boon or curse to corporate communication. Properly planned and managed, meetings are extremely positive and dynamic ways to exchange ideas, shape policy, resolve problems, effect change, etc. However, when poorly designed and implemented, meetings accomplish little. They become virtual breeding grounds for confusion, tension, frustration, boredom and negativity. This course is for petroleum industry professionals who plan and conduct meetings. 

Who Should Attend

Petroleum industry professionals who plan, conduct, and manage meetings


Managing and Leading Others

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course increases the confidence and productivity of leaders, supervisors and managers who may be scientific or technical specialists, but have minimal training in the science and art of leading others. Skills in human relations, communication, motivation, and leadership are essential tools for the supervisor and manager. This course provides techniques enabling leaders to efficiently use one of the greatest resources a company has, its people. This highly interactive learning program will assist you in expanding your options for leading others. You will explore different concepts of management and leadership and how to apply your new skills in real world applications.

Who Should Attend

Anyone responsible for leading others in the daily performance of a work, including soon to be leaders, front-line leaders, new and experienced supervisors and managers, team leaders, coaches, and mentors.


Essential Skills for Resolving Workplace Conflict Among Coworkers

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is uniquely designed for the petroleum industry and provides a basic understanding of conflict, how to respond positively to conflict, how to manage your personal conflict situations, how to use a basic mediation process and how to prevent conflict. The course relies heavily on petroleum industry specific case studies and role play activities. It includes scenarios from major projects, well teams, multidisciplinary teams, petroleum operations and other petroleum industry organizations. 

Who Should Attend

Any employee who may be exposed to internal or external conflict in their work environment and who can become more effective by managing this conflict.


Basic Conflict Management Skills for Managers and Leaders

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is uniquely designed for the petroleum industry and teaches practical processes and skills for resolving interpersonal conflict in major projects, well teams, multidisciplinary teams, petroleum operations and other petroleum industry organizations. The course relies heavily on petroleum industry specific case studies and role play activities.

Who Should Attend

Supervisors, managers, team leaders, project managers, project engineers, project services managers, organizational specialists, facilitators, trainers, negotiators, procurement personnel and all individuals who are exposed to internal or external conflict in their work environment.

02) Project Management Courses
Basic Oilfield Corrosion and Control via Chemical Solutions

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will help attendees develop the awareness of importance and cost of corrosion and how it can be managed and mitigated. It teaches the skills of dealing with chemicals, techniques to evaluate their performances, chemical applications and design to control corrosion.  It will also help attendees learn corrosivity monitoring and the efficiency of the treatment.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for new graduates with chemistry or engineering backgrounds, mid-level engineers and technologist who have some basic prior knowledge of oilfield corrosion; all personnel involved in oil and gas production and processing; management wanting to increase awareness of corrosion impact on business operations and how negative outcomes can be mitigated.


Introduction to Project Management

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

As the relative importance of effective Project Management continues to grow in corporate recognition, as strategies are increasingly set with a project based delivery vehicle in mind, the need for in depth understanding of this complex subject grows. As those in the industry with the knowledge and expertise have an ever shorter period of their working lives left, to be replaced by a new and younger generation, focus on the basics from which to build a robust and in depth knowledge and skill set is increasingly desirable. In order to ensure that competence is created within the next generation of project managers, this course serves as an in depth primer for those wishing to make this fascinating and dynamic area a career.

Who Should Attend

New employees/ graduates or anyone else wishing to obtain a firm understanding of the basics of Project Management. This course serves as a foundation upon which to build further specialist knowledge and create a transferable skill set applicable pan industry.


Petroleum Project Management: Principles and Practices

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Running a successful petroleum operation requires a blend of technology, business savvy, and people skills. If you already have a firm grasp of exploration or production technology, learn to amplify its effectiveness with applied project management techniques. This course is aimed at helping technical personnel make the best business decisions that lead to lowest project cost while still meeting all production or exploration goals. This course covers the principles and application of project management to the upstream oil and gas business. 

Who Should Attend

Exploration, production and management personnel interested in applying project management techniques to their operations.


Project Management for Brownfield Projects

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is designed to teach the skills necessary to effectively plan and manage Brownfield projects or those in existing facilities. This includes due diligence of existing infrastructure, framing the project, concept selection techniques, managing stakeholders, and integration with Operations led projects. The course focuses on the unique challenges of Brownfield projects and how project leaders can effectively work in this Operations centric project environment. Exercises, the case study and discussions make the sessions challenging and insightful.

Who Should Attend

This course is designed for project managers, project engineers, operations staff, and all disciplines that work on integrated project teams for Brownfield or onshore and offshore projects that are installed in existing facilities. Case studies include modification to offshore structures as well as onshore projects.


Project Management for Engineering and Construction

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will provide a comprehensive presentation and discussion of modern project management principles and practices as they relate to project concept selection, development planning, engineering design; procurement; and construction activities for facilities in the oil or gas industry. 

Specific topics included in this course are schedule and cost management, risk management and proper use of scarce resources (people and materials) that will help the project manager make the best decisions possible. Upon completion of this course, the participant will know what the six project management phases entail and be able to employ key project management knowledge areas and project control tools to facilitate successful project outcomes. Participants will understand how project management process groups relate to one another, how execution plans are used to integrate the work effort, what tools are available for the project manager to use, what information will be generated, and what that information means. 

Who Should Attend

Project managers, project engineers, facility engineers, operations engineers, and purchasing personnel including team leaders and managers who plan, manage, or participate on multi-discipline project teams.


Project Management in Upstream Field Development

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course addresses the special requirements associated with developing oil and gas plays where repetitive projects, such as well flow lines, tank batteries, booster compressors, short pipelines and meter stations, are a part of a larger field development program. It explains field development project management principles and practices as they relate to engineering design; procurement; and construction activities for upstream facilities in the oil and gas industry. Upon completion of this course, the participant will know what the engineering, procurement and construction phases entail and be able to fit-for purpose project management techniques and project control tools to facilitate successful project outcomes. Participants will understand how the project management, drilling and completion, HSE, land, production and transportation disciplines relate to one another and what tools are available for the project manager to use to ensure interfaces among key stakeholders are managed. 

Who Should Attend

It is intended for project managers, project engineers, facility engineers, operations engineers, project controls and purchasing personnel who plan, manage, or participate on multi-discipline field development project teams. Special emphasis will be placed on large projects associated with unconventional field development projects, such as shale oil and coal bed methane, as well as projects associated with conventional plays.


Risk Management for Upstream Capital Projects

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This intermediate level course for project managers, project engineers, and integrated project team discipline members addresses the key areas associated with capital project risk management. The course focuses on managing risk throughout the entire project life cycle. This course is very much hands-on with class exercise case studies that focus on participant development of risk management deliverables. The class also addresses the methods that project team leaders can utilize to ensure that project team members and management buy in and are part of the risk management process.

Who Should Attend

Project managers, project engineers, and all disciplines that work on integrated project teams for upstream onshore and offshore developments. 


The Science and Technology of Water Treating

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides a fundamental understanding of the science and practical applications of water treating. It presents the fundamental mechanisms behind various water treating equipment and processes. Throughout the course, field experiences, practical issues, and field performance of equipment is analyzed and explained in terms of surface science, chemistry and engineering principles. The scientific aspects of water treating are presented in a practical down-to-earth manner that can be understood with little prior study, and can be immediately implemented in the field. The full project life cycle is covered from concept selection to front end engineering, detailed design, operation, and troubleshooting.

Who Should Attend

The course is intended for process, facilities, and chemical engineers involved in either designing or troubleshooting water-treating systems. 


Understanding Inorganic Scaling: Mechanisms, Control, and Management

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is an introduction to inorganic scaling. It includes an overview of the different types of inorganic oilfield scales encountered during production, and the various methods used to control them.

Who Should Attend

Scaling is one of the most persistent flow assurance issues in the oilfield. Anyone involved on the production side of the business should have a basic understanding of problems of inorganic scale.


Flow Assurance: Managing Flow Dynamics and Production Chemistry

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course presents a holistic approach to flow assurance. The course will introduce technologies, workflows and their deployment for the identification, characterization, and management of flow impediments, such as slugging and precipitation of organic and inorganic solids. The course will present best practices and fit-for-purpose design solutions for minimizing the risk of flow stoppage while transporting hydrocarbons from “Pore to Sales Meter”. The principles will be demonstrated using field examples from around the world.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for engineers and chemists in the upstream and downstream segments of the petroleum industry.


Multiphase Pumping: Fundamentals to Field Applications

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is an overview of state-of-the-art multiphase pumping technology. It covers the various aspects of multiphase pumping, from concept to field applications, with emphasis on the practical side.

Who Should Attend

Petroleum, reservoir, production, facilities engineers, as well as operations and maintenance staff will benefit from this course. It is also for project engineers and managers who are considering the use of multiphase pumps in their projects.


Project Cost Scheduling

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

The financial dynamic to successful project delivery lies at the very heart of effective project management. A project is a complex series of interactions between time; people and resources - their allocation and utilization. Project Cost Scheduling highlights and informs the participant of how to manage the project cost function - its dynamics and components - leading to an enhanced understanding and application of techniques that will contribute directly to more efficient project management processes. The course contains a significant element of practical exercise that builds daily, allowing participants to grasp the inter-relationships between cost; project lifecycle and operational activities, thereby imparting clarity to the whole process of successful project delivery.

Who Should Attend

Exploration, production, and management personnel who wish to apply project management techniques to their activities and operations


Project Decision-Making

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

Project success depends on the effectiveness of all project decisions, not just the few made formally via structured methods. This course applies a variety of insights from diverse fields including psychology, cognitive science, naturalistic decisionmaking, action science, sense making, mathematics, and communication theory to improve engineering decision-making. Learnings and insights from the course are used to develop a strategy for improving decision-making and to develop answers to four questions of key importance in project design:

  • Why do so many changes occur late in projects?
  • Why do we have so many problems at interfaces?
  • Why do we repeat mistakes from project to project?
  • Why do projects usually finish late?
Who Should Attend

Engineers, operations staff and other technical professionals involved in project design, execution or operation.


Risk Management for Upstream Capital Projects

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course addresses the key areas associated with capital project risk management. The course focuses on managing risk throughout the entire project life cycle. This course is very much hands-on with class exercise case studies that focus on participant development of risk management deliverables. 

Who Should Attend

Project managers, project engineers, and all disciplines that work on integrated project teams for upstream onshore and offshore developments. 


Advanced Project Management

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This specific course is for professionals seeking an in-depth understanding of key principles and techniques of project management and how to apply them on large international projects. This course provides advanced knowledge in contract strategy, project governance, engineering and technology management, stakeholder management, joint venture and non-operated projects, interface management, risk management, reviews and approvals and management information systems.

Who Should Attend

Project Managers, Asset Managers, Project Control Managers and Project Engineers Experienced project managers, project engineers, asset manager, project controls managers and construction managers that are involved in engineering, procurement and construction of surface facilities and pipelines for large onshore and offshore projects. 


Offshore Pipeline Projects

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is a practical, hands-on work session in offshore pipeline project management, addressing the six key phases of project execution: 

  • Development, 
  • Engineering, 
  • Procurement, 
  • Construction, 
  • Pre-commissioning, and 
  • Start-up/operations. 

The course maintains a balance between lecture and work session using in-class exercises to demonstrate the relationships between sound practice and application. 

Who Should Attend

This course is for pipeline personnel who are or will be responsible for the execution of offshore pipeline projects. Participants should include personnel from operator’s pipeline project teams, design engineering staff, material supplier, and construction contractor personnel. The course is designed to benefit all levels of experience.

03) Petroleum Industry Courses
Basic Drilling, Completion and Workover Operations

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course gives a technical overview of the science and art of drilling operations, completion practices and post-completion wellbore enhancement or remedial workover techniques (well intervention). 

Reservoir Engineers will learn what can be done within open-hole and cased wells as they execute reservoir management. 

Drilling and completion personnel will learn how the producing reservoir can be damaged or stimulated by what they do. 

Participants will learn to visualize what is happening “downhole”, discover what can be accomplished and gain an appreciation for wellbore risks and the possibility of damage to the formation; and how drilling and completion practices can alter reservoir interpretation and performance. 

Who Should Attend

Technical, field, service, support and supervisory personnel desiring to gain an introductory overview of these topics and how they interrelate. Excellent for cross-training of other technical disciplines such as reservoir and surface facility engineers plus geoscientists, and anyone who interacts with drilling, completion or workover design engineers such as technical supervisors and technical service personnel. 


Basic Petroleum Economics

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Could you answer the following three questions for your next project? What will it cost? What is it worth? Will it earn sufficient profit? Before undertaking any project, these questions should be answered. This course will provide the fundamentals necessary to enable you to do so. Budgeting and financing, and contractual arrangements, which also significantly impact the economic viability of a project, are covered. Participants will practice cash flow techniques for economic evaluations and investigate frequently encountered situations. 

Who Should Attend

Engineers, explorationists, field accounting supervisors, managers and other personnel who need to develop their skills and understanding of the basic economic analysis, profitability of petroleum exploration and production. 


Basic Petroleum Engineering Practices

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is a basic introduction to most aspects of the Petroleum Engineering discipline which includes Reservoir, Production and Drilling Engineering as well as related topics. This course lays the groundwork for further specialized training in advanced courses for oil company and service company personnel. The course focuses on the field and application approach; and includes classroom exercises, fundamental engineering problems and basic field exercises. Basic Petroleum Engineering Practices will set the foundation for technical professionals with regards to technology and its engineering applications.

Who Should Attend

Engineers, engineering trainees, technical managers and assistants, technicians, geologists, geophysicists, chemists, physicists, service company personnel, sales representatives, and data processing personnel


Basic Petroleum Technology

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course presents a non-technical, practical understanding of petroleum industry technology in an interesting, effective, and efficient manner.  After being taught key concepts participants are given case-studies in which they adopt roles of Reservoir Engineer and Drilling/Completion Engineer to get a basic understanding of real-life situations and perform basic analysis. 

Who Should Attend

Non-Technical, Administrative, management, field support, accounting, purchasing, economics, legal, finance, human resources, drafting, land and data processing personnel, as well as investors and royalty owners.


Cost Management

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Few problems threaten the petroleum businesses more than uncontrolled costs. The course will cover costs management from the basics to the most recent events and trends, using relevant exercises, timely case studies and role-playing techniques. This course is an introduction to Practical Cost Management techniques designed to help the participant better understand the underlying dynamics of cost, which will lead to better decision making concerning products and services, work flows, capital investments, as well as the day-to-day monitoring of the business.

Who Should Attend

Operating managers, field personnel, project managers, technology managers, budget managers, or practically anyone in the company wanting to manage costs in a more efficient and effective manner. 


Deepwater Drilling and Production Technology

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course describes the deepwater technology that has been developed and implemented in the last few years. Each of the DW system components is discussed in terms of its engineering challenges. Introducing each technology area is a brief description of the conventional water depth technology from which the new, DW concepts have evolved. The basis for selection of particular field configurations are discussed.

Who Should Attend

Individuals with at least some awareness of basic offshore engineering and operations. Technical staff, project engineers, engineering discipline leads, engineering specialists and operating staff find this course accelerates their capability to contribute to deepwater development planning, design and construction projects and field operations.


Economics of Worldwide Petroleum Production 

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Techniques for predicting profit, production, operating costs, and cash flow are taught in this course to help participants in evaluating decision alternatives for optimum results. Understanding cost of capital, financial structure, risk and uncertainty, present worth, rate of return, and other economic yardsticks enhances the quality and the value of economic analysis.

Who Should Attend

Managers, supervisors and operating personnel concerned with costs, profitability, budgets, the company “bottom line” and other aspects of economic analysis of petroleum production on a project, corporate, and worldwide basis, who have had some previous experience in this area. 


Evaluating and Developing Heavy Oil Resources

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

The course is largely designed for geoscientist or engineers with a need to advance their understanding of heavy oil resources. It provides an overview and details of specific occurrences of the geology, evaluation, development and commerciality of heavy oil resources. Beginning level concepts are covered and widely focused enough to appeal to a broad audience seeking an introduction to the business of heavy oil including non-technical administrative and business groups. However, more technically advanced topics are also covered where the student is generally expected to have a technical foundation for understanding. 

Who Should Attend

Geoscientist or engineers with a need to better understand the challenges of evaluating and developing heavy oil resources.


Evaluating and Developing Shale Resources

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will cover current practices for evaluating, drilling and completing these challenging reservoirs. Discussion will include a focus on the limitations of many of the current tools and technologies. Information and opportunities for international shale plays will be described. Participants will leave the course with a foundational understanding of value-adding shale gas resource practices and an insight into determining the critical reservoir parameters used to predict a potential commercial resource play.

Who Should Attend

Reservoir, production and completion engineers, petrophysicists, geologists, geophysicists and other professionals who desire a thorough overview of both current and emerging concepts, technologies and processes related to shale gas and shale oil resource development.


Exploration and Production Process Basics: Understanding Petroleum Industry Value Cycle

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course describes the petroleum value chain from prospect identification, to project commissioning and to final abandonment. Participants will leave this course with a firm understanding of the petroleum industry including, the knowledge and tools necessary for understand the relationships and dependencies across the E&P industry. This course offers a fresh look at a range of critical, inter-related topics and will be taught with the modern learner in mind. Uncertainties, risk management, business practices and project management lessons are learned through these team based events.

Who Should Attend

This training course is designed for Newly-hired engineers and geoscientists


Field Study - Heavy Oil Resources

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

The course is geologically and technically focused but instructed in a manner so that all disciplines and experience levels will understand. Mining and on site production of bitumen from the Athabasca oil sand region is currently a major contributor to the world’s oil production. These technologies are reasonably recent commercial applications and the future levels of production faces uncertainty because of highly debated environmental challenges. The field course takes the student to the rock; explaining complex relationships and issues emanating from the depositional and structural framework.

Who Should Attend

Anyone who wants a hands-on understanding of the Athabasca Oil Sands.


Fundamentals of Reservoir Description and Modeling with Geo-statistics

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course introduces engineers, geologists, and geoscientists to the fundamental theory and practice of reservoir description and modeling for reservoir management. Participants will learn the fundamental concepts of reservoir description and modeling using geostatistical techniques. This course emphasizes the principles and practice of integrated studies and uncertainty analysis.

Who Should Attend

This course is for petroleum engineers, geologists and geoscientists who want to apply reservoir description and modeling techniques for reservoir management. It is also for managers and supervisors who wish to update their skills to the current level of the technology.


Introduction to Petroleum Business

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will introduce participants to key concepts of the petroleum business including its structure, how oil companies are organized and financed and what it takes to be financially successful. Success will be explored through an understanding of the meaning of long-term shareholder value, its measurement at the macro and micro level and the role competitive advantage plays in achieving superior financial goals. Participants will be introduced to both accounting and economic evaluation as a means to understanding the financial side of the petroleum business. Additionally, participants will be introduced to risk and its impact on economic evaluation. 

Who Should Attend

Engineers, geologists, geophysicists, landmen, HR and other non-finance and accounting professionals who need an introduction to the business aspects of the petroleum industry including the interplay of finance and economic evaluation in the creation of long-term shareholder value.


Oil and Gas Business Discovery

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This simulation experience enables participants to assume the role of senior management who are managing operations spanning the full value chain from license acquisition to exploration, appraisal and production, and oil & gas marketing. The program takes participants on a simulated, multi-year journey where small teams collaborate, build fundamental capabilities and practice real-world decision making. 

Who Should Attend

Staff from all disciplines who want to know more about the full value chain and to gain a deeper understanding of the part their role plays in a wider context.


Overview of the Heavy Oil Resources

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Heavy oil is a large component of the world’s oil resource. Commercial mining and current in-situ thermal production methodologies are important contributors to the world’s oil production. These technologies are reasonably recent commercial applications, and the future levels of production face uncertainty because of highly debated environmental challenges. This course takes an unbiased practical approach to the applications citing benefits and limitations. Overview of Heavy Oil Resources provides an overview of the aspects of the geology, development and commerciality of heavy oil resources. 

Who Should Attend

Anyone of any discipline who needs a better understanding of heavy oil resources


Overview of the Petroleum Industry

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course presents an overview of the Petroleum Industry from the point-of-view of the Asset Management Cycle. By explaining the real-life steps involved in the creation and exploitation of oil and gas fields, participants will be given introduction to the exciting processes which drive industry and create new value. Emphasis is on Onshore as well as Offshore projects, including both large and small fields. Each step of the cycle is introduced with a summary of relevant technologies, economics, manpower requirements, importance of training and competency assessment, as well as relevant case histories. Both conventional and unconventional oil and gas prospects are included.

Who Should Attend

Both technical and business oriented professionals who are either new to the upstream oil and gas industry or experienced in one part, but could benefit from a wider point of view, all levels of support staff working in the industry, as well as investing or financial personnel with a need to better understand the industry.


Petroleum Budgeting and Performance Workshop

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Global oil and gas companies are becoming more and more complex in their operations and the projects are growing larger and more expensive. As prices and costs fluctuate widely in a matter of months, it is more important than ever to be able to create budgets and make plans that are accurate and flexible. This course is an introduction to Budgeting and Planning techniques designed to help the participant better understand the underlying dynamics of operational inputs and how they determine performance, which should eventually lead to better decision making concerning work flows, products and services and capital investments.

Who Should Attend

Operating managers, field personnel, project managers, technology managers, cost control personnel, budget analysts, financial analysts, department managers, or anyone in the company dealing with budgets, planning and performance analysis.


Petroleum Finance & Accounting Principles

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Making the most efficient use of your resources is critical to the success of any company. Finance and accounting comprise the universal business language and help you manage those resources effectively. Planning and decision making that occur in an informal financial context permit better application of resources and promote competitive advantage. 

The aim of this course is to improve participant’s job performance by enhancing their understanding of current international practices in finance and accounting within the E&P industry. 

Who Should Attend

Personnel new to the oil and gas accounting industry, others desiring to understand or refresh their knowledge of basic petroleum accounting concepts, other financial personnel needing to understand unique issues as they relate to the petroleum industry and technical people looking for the basic concepts of accounting and finance. 


Petroleum Risk and Decision Analysis

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Good technical and business decisions are based on competent analysis of project costs, benefits and risks. Participants learn the decision analysis process and foundation concepts so they can actively participate in multi-discipline evaluation teams. 

  • The focus is on designing and solving decision models. 
  • Probability distributions express professional judgments about risks and uncertainties and are carried through the calculations. 
  • Decision tree and influence diagrams provide clear communications and basis for valuing each alternative. 
  • The complementary Monte Carlo simulation technique is experienced in detail in a hand-calculation exercise. 
  • Project modeling fundamentals and basic probability concepts provide the foundation for the calculations. The mathematics is straightforward and mostly involves only common algebra. 
  • The emphasis in this course is on practical techniques for immediate application.
Who Should Attend

Geologists, engineers, planners, economists, geo-physicists, team leaders and managers.


Production Forecast and Reserves: Estimates in Unconventional Resources

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course teaches the skills and understanding needed to forecast production and estimate reserves in unconventional (ultra-low permeability) oil and gas reservoirs. The course emphasizes “simple” production decline models appropriate for routine forecasting for hundreds of wells in short periods of time. Both tight oil and gas reservoirs, such as shales resources, are discussed.

Who Should Attend

The course is for engineers and geoscientists who are interested in learning how to evaluate unconventional reservoirs.


Ensuring Reliable SCAL Data for Reservoir Modeling

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

Special Core Analysis, SCAL data has a direct impact on the way fluids are allocated and distributed in the reservoir simulation models, which would directly impact reservoirs’ STOIIP (Stock Tank Oil-Initially-In-Place) estimation and their distribution. Moreover, it directly affects the performance of secondary and EOR flooding processes, and in turn impacts the accuracy of the oil and gas reserve estimates, and the management of these reserves. 

Therefore, SCAL data could be considered as one of the most critical reservoir input data for reservoir simulation models.This course will shed light on the theoretical and experimental background of SCAL data:

  • It will explain the concept of reservoir wettability and different factors that could induce changes in reservoir wettability. 
  • It will cover the concept of capillary pressure and its associated hysteresis for different wettability conditions, followed by the concepts of two phase water/oil and gas/oil relative permeability curves and how to generate three relative permeability data for water wet, mixed and oil wet reservoirs. 
  • It will clarify the saturation end point of both capillary pressure and relative curves as a function of reservoir heterogeneity and wettability. 
  • Finally, the course will support the idea of reservoir wettability profile, when will it happen and how to deal with it.
Who Should Attend

This course is designed for Research and Development Engineers, Technical Managers, Reservoir Engineers, Reservoir Geologists, Petrophysicist, and Geophysicists. 


Field Development Economics

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

In this course, participants will learn to construct an economic evaluation of a field development opportunity using common industry indicators. Supported by many practical examples, the course covers both greenfield and brownfield situations. 

Who Should Attend

This course is for engineers, geoscientists and managers who want to use economic methods for making field development decisions. 


Fundamentals of International Oil and Gas Law

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is designed to give participants a basic understanding of the legal fundamentals that make their international transactions work, ranging from the principles that apply to interpreting and enforcing their agreements, to the procedures for resolving their disputes, to addressing interpretational issues posed by common contract provisions, and to avoiding liability under environmental and bribery laws. The course will allow participants to identify confidently potential legal problems, to address them before they become serious, and to facilitate the smooth interaction between oil and gas professionals, host government representatives, and their lawyers.

Who Should Attend

Petroleum managers who deal with international oil and gas legal matters in the course of their business; and legal professionals with little training in oil and gas law, but expect soon to deal with international oil and gas law matters.


International Petroleum Contracts

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

You will learn the philosophy, evolution, and fundamentals of international petroleum contracts and have an opportunity to see how each of these actually works. You will take part in life-like negotiating sessions mastering many negotiating techniques, where a mistake is a learning experience not a disaster. A viable contract cannot be negotiated without an effective understanding of the underlying economics. Negotiating strategies will determine contractual terms ultimately defining the economic benefits to be realized. Concessions and production sharing agreements are two of the contract types to be evaluated during this course. 

Who Should Attend

Exploration & production managers; national oil company managers; government representatives and others in the oil industry who expect to be involved in negotiating, administering, reviewing, managing, directing, and overseeing international exploration and production contracts.


Modern Production Data Analysis for Unconventional Reservoirs

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides attendees with a comprehensive methodology for well performance analysis with specific focus on unconventional oil and gas. The approach combines the use of several powerful techniques and will illustrate the practical aspects of production data analysis. 

Who Should Attend

This course is for engineers and technologists involved in exploitation, evaluating reserves, optimizing production or analyzing well tests.


Petroleum Reserves

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

In this course, participants learn to estimate petroleum reserves using SEC and SPE/WPC definitions, guidelines and latest interpretations. Instructors will present the main reservoir engineering and geoscience methods used to estimate reserves, and demonstrate how definitions affect such estimates. Case studies are used to illustrate different methods for estimating reserves, along with typical errors and how to avoid them. Participants will also learn supplemental techniques such as reservoir simulation and probabilistic methods for estimating reserves.

Who Should Attend

This course is designed for industry professionals involved in estimating or filing petroleum reserves under SEC or SPE/WPC guidelines, or any oil or gas professionals interested in gaining a better understanding of the process of estimating reserves.


Practical Techniques for Screening Deepwater: Offshore Oil & Gas Exploration Prospects

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will discuss the practical state-of-the-art techniques of Volume to Value(VV) to help attendees assess exploratory deepwater offshore oil and gas prospects and quantify economic values of the prospects. 

Participants will learn how to develop a preliminary field development plan for a given discovery prospect and estimate oil and gas recovery, wells required, and costs. They will also learn how to conduct economic evaluation for lease sales or farm-in opportunities.

Who Should Attend

This course is for petroleum, reservoir and production engineers, and geoscientists, economists, managers, and investors as well as government officials interested in screening deepwater offshore oil and gas exploration prospects for lease sales and/or farm-in opportunities should attend this course.


Project Risk, Uncertainty, and Decision Analysis 

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

In this course, you’ll learn to apply risk and uncertainty management principles to decision quality analysis in the development of oil and gas reserves.  This course starts with setting the background with statistics and probabilities, estimating under uncertainty and probabilistic reserves estimation principles. Then it introduces ways to determine the chance of geological and commercial success, and the use of decision trees to assess the value of new information.

Who Should Attend

This course is for anyone who is involved with making quality decisions about the development of subsurface hydrocarbon accumulations.


Strategic Thinking: A Tool-Based Approach

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is a hands-on, case-based course focused on managers responsible for building and sustaining a successful strategic plan. Participants are exposed to a variety of perspectives on, approaches to, and tools for the conduct of strategic management. These tools address strategy from a macro and micro perspective. 

There is a major emphasis on historical, current, and potential “game changers”, especially on how they are now transforming the industry’s future. Applied techniques during this course provide opportunities for individualized and team-based learning.

Who Should Attend

Geologists, geophysicist, engineers, managers, and executives responsible for defining, assessing and developing business alternatives and strategy in the petroleum industry


Unconventional Reservoir Production (Rate Transient) Analysis

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides an overview of the state-of-the-art in unconventional gas (shale gas, tight gas, and coalbed methane) and light oil (shale oil, tight oil, and “halo” oil) well production analysis. An overview of analytical methods for RTA is then provided, including a discussion of how these techniques can be modified to account for unconventional reservoir properties such as multi-phase flow, non-static permeability, non-Darcy flow, and desorption. Empirical methods for production analysis are also briefly reviewed in this course. Tight gas, shale gas, tight oil, shale oil, and coalbed methane field examples are provided to illustrate application of the techniques.

Who Should Attend

Engineers, geologists and managers in industry involved in developing / evaluating unconventional gas reserves.


Advance Decision Analysis with Portfolio and Project Modeling

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

Quality forecasts and evaluations depend upon well-designed project and portfolio models that are based upon clear decision policy, sound professional judgments, and a good decision process. In this course participants learn to build good models. Emphasis is on the evaluation concepts and techniques, rather than particular software programs. 

Who Should Attend

Evaluation engineers, analysts, managers, planners, and economists. This course is intended for professionals involved with developing project evaluation, portfolio, and other forecasting and assessment models. 

Note: Prior background in decision analysis is expected. 


History Matching and Conditioning Reservoir Models to Dynamic Data

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course explores ways to incorporate production data into high-resolution reservoir models using both conventional and fast-flow simulation techniques, and it examines the merits of various history matching workflows practiced in the industry. Both assisted history matching and automatic history matching techniques will also be covered. 

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for engineers, geologists, and geophysicists interested in reservoir characterization, reservoir management/optimization & history matching of geologic models.


Oilfield Data Mining

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course examines the successful application of Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining (AI&DM) in the E&P industry in the past several years. It will start with the fundamentals of AI&DM, covering artificial neural networks, evolutionary computing, and fuzzy logic. 

The course is devoted to field application of this technology with focus on production optimization and recovery enhancement.

Who Should Attend

This course is designed for reservoir, completion and production engineers of operating companies as well as service company personnel involved with: 

  • Planning, 
  • Completion, and 
  • Operating wells.
04) Operations Courses
Applied Maintenance Management

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides essential knowledge required for achieving excellence in maintenance management. Work control, planning, and scheduling will be covered. Participants will receive a sound, integrated, basic knowledge of the maintenance function and how to progress towards world-class performance. Individual action plans will carry course learning into the work environment. 

Who Should Attend

Maintenance supervisors, team leaders, or managers needing to improve their maintenance programs. This course is a broad survey of essential aspects of maintaining a safe, efficient and reliable facility asset.


Contracts and Tenders Fundamentals

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Contracts and Tenders Fundamentals will provide attendees with a more strategic approach to contracting, along with numerous tools to use throughout the contracting process. When you leave this course, you will improve job performance through: 1) better alignment of contract process steps with supply needs; 2) better contracts; 3) fewer disputes and claims; and 4) better contract outcomes. Contracting involves many roles that must work together to achieve desired outcomes. Everyone involved in some element of contracting must understand the entire process, keys to success and what is required of their role. Materials and exercises are built around oil and gas industry issues to be more relevant to the needs of attendees.

Who Should Attend

Individuals involved in any aspect of sourcing, tendering, selecting, forming and executing contracts with suppliers of goods and services to the oil and gas industry. 

It includes supply chain roles such as contracting and procurement specialists, sourcing specialists, category managers, and logistics managers. 

It is also intended for technical roles assigned to project work such as facilities engineers, drilling engineers, project engineers and coordinators, commissioning engineers, contracts engineers, planning engineers, asset managers, and legal trainees.


Effective Materials Management

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course covers practical considerations essential to achieve major improvements in planning, buying, storing and disposing of the vast array of materials and spare parts needed in oil and gas industry. Evolving best practices in the industry are explored for inventory management, warehousing and investment recovery.

Who Should Attend

Professional and management personnel who have responsibility for, materials, spare parts and supplies needed to support any refinery, gas plant, onshore/offshore production or other industry operations. 

Buyers, procurement specialists, stock analysts, and logistics, warehouse, distribution or operations supervisors will benefit from this course by learning the techniques and principles for providing better service to their operations, reducing stock outs and surplus materials and maximizing the return on investment for inventory.


Fractional Distillation

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course shows how crude oil is converted by fractional distillation to premium quality gasoline, diesel, kerosene, jet fuel, lubes, and subsequent chemical / refinery unit feedstocks. The course is excellent for experienced operators who want to understand the ‘why’ as well as the ‘how’ of separation, fractional distillation, and splitting processes. The course introduces operators to basic troubleshooting techniques for the process, equipment, and critical controls.

Who Should Attend

Refinery, process unit operations and maintenance technicians, supervisors and managers, as well as other non-engineering personnel requiring a fundamental focus on refinery processing facilities.


Fundamentals of Process Safety

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

The course is designed to cover the fundamentals of Process Safety for all staff levels in a high hazard installation. It will benefit anyone who requires to understand the essentials of process safety including managers, supervisors, technical, engineering, HSE, maintenance and operational staff who are associated with the design, construction, operation, maintenance and governance of high hazard installations in the upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical industry. 

To explore the multiple roles involved in Process Safety and allow participants from different backgrounds to relate to this subject there is a rolling case study throughout the course. 

This course will identify how different disciplines and roles can have an impact on safety performance.

Who Should Attend

All staff associated with the operation, maintenance and governance of high hazard installations in the upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical industry. 

The content is relevant to all roles, including senior management, project and engineering support teams, HSE support, supervisors and operator and maintenance technicians. 


Gas Dehydration and Amine Sweetening for Operations & Maintenance

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will provide the basic knowledge required for understanding operating issues in natural gas amine sweetening and dehydration units. This course is customizable to client needs.

Who Should Attend

Plant and facility operations and maintenance technicians, supervisors and managers.


Gas Production/Processing for Operations & Maintenance

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will provide a more detailed examination of the processes found in gas production facilities, including the important theoretical aspects that must be mastered before operators can truly understand their processes and become proficient at avoiding problems and troubleshooting the technical problems that do arise. This course prepares operations personnel to communicate better and work more closely with professional engineering staff. 

Who Should Attend

Plant and facility operations and maintenance technicians, supervisors and managers.


LNG Facilities for Operations & Maintenance

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

The course includes in-depth information on basic LNG mixed refrigerant processing. Instructors will explain contaminant removal processes employed in LNG processes. Relevant details of the APCI process in LNG liquefaction are described. Class exercises/problems focus on application of theory to operational trends so operators can understand their processes and become proficient at identifying issues and troubleshooting problems before production suffers. 

Who Should Attend

LNG plant and utility operations and maintenance technicians, supervisors and managers.


Maintenance Planning and Work Control

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is designed to build competency in Work Control as a primary skill set in the Competency Map for Facilities Maintenance Management. It will focus on the six phases of work management: work identification, planning, prioritization, scheduling, execution and history capture. These essential skills are the key components of integrity management, safety, resource control, and reliable operation. 

Who Should Attend

Maintenance managers, superintendents, supervisors, team leaders and planners engaged in work management, planning, and scheduling.


NGL Fractionation and Cryogenic NGL Recovery for Operations & Maintenance

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will provide the basic knowledge required for understanding operating issues in cryogenic NGL (Natural Gas Liquids) extraction and stabilization/fractionation. Course content is non-mathematical.

Who Should Attend

Plant and facility operations and maintenance technicians, supervisors and managers.


Oil & Gas Processing Facilities for Operations & Maintenance

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will provide the basic knowledge required for understanding processes and operating issues common to oil and gas processing facilities. 

Who Should Attend

Production and processing operations and maintenance technicians, supervisors and managers, as well as other non-engineering personnel requiring a broad introduction to production and processing facilities, including the separation, conditioning and disposition of produced oil, gas and water; including the common operational difficulties that may arise, as well as the operational tactics used to resolve them.


Cost/Price Analysis and Total Cost Concepts in Supply Management

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

Managing and reducing cost continues to be one of the primary focal points of business and governments today. Maintaining a competitive position and even survival will depend on the organization’s ability to use all of the continuous improvement strategies which have been developed to reduce cost across the entire supply chain for the life of the product or service. Fundamental to developing and implementing these strategies is knowledge of Cost/Price Analysis, Value Analysis and Total Cost of Ownership concepts. This course provides the concepts of Cost/Price/Value Analysis and Total Cost of Ownership that are essential skill sets in developing and implementing the strategies required to achieve the high levels of cost reductions possible from the supply chain.

Who Should Attend

Managers and professionals in purchasing, procurement, and contracts and those involved in activities that expose them to suppliers and buying activities for production, maintenance, equipment and services requirements.


Inside Procurement in Oil & Gas

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will expand the industry understanding of supply chain professionals and increase their value-added in a global, fast changing environment. Participants will learn what each industry segment requires from procurement and be given insights to maximize value delivery and increase their contribution to any business unit of the organization. Attendees will leave better prepared to create and support procurement strategies that meet stakeholder needs whether for projects or operations support.

Who Should Attend

Supply chain professionals with 2-7 years experience either inside or outside the oil and gas industry. The course is for anyone who needs a better understanding of procurement value creation in the oil & gas industry


Strategic Procurement & Supply Management in the O&G Industry

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This program explores key concepts forming the basis of strategic supply management and moves today’s supply management organization from its typical tactical focus to the strategic focus needed to successfully implement the processes and methods needed to gain performance.

Who Should Attend

Managers and Professionals in Supply Management, Procurement, Purchasing, Contracts, Materials, Inventory Control, Projects, Maintenance, Operations, Finance and all other Managers and Professionals interested in lowering total cost and increasing productivity and profit contributions from better supply management operations in obtaining equipment, goods, and services in the Oil and Gas Industry.


Supplier Relationship Management

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

Continuous improvement in all aspects of the supply chain is necessary to remain competitive in today’s global economy. Supplier Relationship Management (SRM) and collaboration provide an organizational focus on communicating with suppliers on the many steps of the Supply Management process. This focus reduces the lead-time and total cost of acquisition, transportation, administration, and possession of goods and services for the benefit of both the buyer and seller and as a result provides a competitive advantage and improved profits.

Who Should Attend

Managers and professionals involved in purchasing, projects, contracts, supply management, operations, maintenance, engineering, quality, and other activities that expose them to dealings with suppliers for goods, equipment, and services in the Oil and Gas Industry and who want to improve the supplier relationship for the benefit of both.

05) Process Facilities Courses
Applied Water Technology in Oil and Gas Production

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides an overview of the main water handling systems typically encountered in upstream (E&P) production operations, both onshore and offshore. The chemistry of the main water related problems of mineral scales, corrosion, bacteria, and oily water will be reviewed both from the theoretical and practical aspects. Produced water treatment equipment and typical water quality specifications will be reviewed as well as water injection and disposal systems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding and resolving operational problems in process equipment.

Who Should Attend

Managers, engineers, chemists, and operators needing to understand water related problems in oil and gas production and their solutions.


Corrosion Management in Production/Processing Operations

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will cover the main causes of corrosion in upstream oil and gas operations, as well as monitoring and mitigation methods. The various corrosion mechanisms give rise to a number of different forms of corrosion damage which will all be considered. Participants will estimate the corrosivity of a given environment through analysis of the chemical and physical characteristics of the system. You will review approaches to selecting materials and coatings for corrosion resistance for different conditions and their applications. 

The course content is based on a field facilities engineering point of view as opposed to a more narrowly specialized corrosion engineering or chemistry viewpoint. This course provides an appropriate balance of necessary theory and practical applications to solve/mitigate corrosion related problems.

Who Should Attend

Managers, engineers, chemists, and operators needing to understand corrosion and its control management in oil and gas production and processing.


Introduction to Oil and Gas Production Facilities

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides a high level discussion of surface processing facilities used in oil and gas production with emphasis on the selection and specification of these facilities as part of a field development plan. 

The importance of knowledge about reservoir type, produced fluid composition and properties, drive mechanism, facility location, product specifications and contractual obligations is highlighted.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for those who are interested in how production facilities are selected and specified:

Subsurface engineers looking for a better understanding of production/processing facilities.

Facilities/Process engineers looking for an entry level review of surface production facilities.

Other technical professionals not directly involved in the design and operation of production facilities looking for an awareness of such facilities.


Oil Production & Processing Facilities

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

The emphasis of this course is on oil production facilities - from the wellhead to the delivery of a specification crude oil product to the refinery. Both onshore and offshore facilities will be discussed. Produced water treating and water injection systems are also covered. Solution gas handling processes and equipment will be discussed as well, though at a relatively high level. In addition to the engineering aspects of oil production facilities, practical operating problems will also be covered including emulsion treatment, sand handling, dealing with wax and asphaltenes, etc. Exercises requiring calculations are utilized throughout the course. 

Who Should Attend

Process/facilities engineers, senior operating personnel, and chemists. Wide-ranging skills for design, operation and troubleshooting of oil and water production equipment.


Process Utility Systems

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will provide an overview of the various Utility Systems, key selection considerations and how they are integrated into onshore and offshore oil and gas facilities. Individuals will develop a basic understanding of the wide variety of utility systems and components and how they integrate with the process facilities and overall operation. 

System selection, relative costs and other managerial decisions pertinent to utility operations are covered. Exercises are used to identify utility consumers, summarize utility requirements, consider high level utility systems options, and select the most energy efficient alternatives from an onshore and offshore perspective.

Who Should Attend

Facility Engineers or engineers new to utility systems who are responsible for designing, operating and maintaining utility systems in oil and gas processing and related facilities. Most operations and planning activities depend on a fundamental knowledge of utility systems.

This important subject is frequently overlooked however it is vital to successful oil and gas operations. Attending this course will assist participants in developing a broad background in utility systems.


Produced Water Treating

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course covers technical topics related to produced water operations and the required processing in upstream oil and gas operations. Typical produced water composition and physical properties are covered. Water quality requirements as a function of disposal method are addressed, including onshore processing, surface discharge, offshore discharge, and reinjection. Regulatory requirements and typical analytical test methods necessary to monitor and ensure regulatory compliance are covered. 

Treatment theory is discussed, followed by practical application in selecting and operating typical water handling equipment. 

Typical process flow diagrams are used to illustrate equipment selection, design features, layout and processes. Chemical treatment is also covered in this course.

Who Should Attend

Managers, engineers, chemists, and senior operations personnel who are responsible for designing, operating and maintaining oil and gas facilities that process produced water. This course will assist participants in developing a broad understanding of the technical aspects which are required to select, design, maintain, and troubleshoot produced water process equipment and systems.


Heat Transfer Equipment

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course reviews the selection, basic design, and operation of heat transfer equipment commonly used in the oil and gas industry with focus on E&P production facilities. Heat transfer equipment discussed will include shell and tube exchangers, compact heat exchangers, brazed aluminum exchangers, air coolers, and fired equipment.

Who Should Attend

Engineers & senior operating personnel involved in the design, specification, or operation of heat transfer equipment.


Onshore Gas Gathering Systems: Design & Operation

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course deals with the design, operation and optimization of onshore gas gathering systems and their associated field facilities, from the wellhead to the central gas processing facility. From a design perspective, the main variables that impact the flexibility and operational characteristics of an onshore gas gathering system will be discussed. Typical operating problems are covered including hydrates, multiphase flow issues, corrosion, declining well deliverability, etc. Exercises will be utilized throughout the course to emphasize the key learning points.

Who Should Attend

Production & facilities department engineers/senior operating personnel responsible for the design, operation and optimization of onshore gas gathering systems and their associated field facilities


Relief and Flare Systems

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

The course begins with the need for pressure control/overpressure protection, continues with the key engineering and design aspects including Code considerations, and concludes with selecting and defining the components of a relief and flare system. The material of the course is applicable to onshore field production facilities, pipelines, gas plants, terminals, and offshore production facilities.

Who Should Attend

Engineers & senior operating personnel responsible for designing, operating and maintaining relief and flare systems in oil and gas facilities


Separation Equipment - Selection & Sizing

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course covers the different types of separation equipment typically encountered in oil & gas production facilities. Fractionation equipment and produced water treating equipment are not covered in this course. You will learn where the different types of separation equipment are used based on operating conditions and separation performance requirements. Frequent references will be made to real production facility process flow diagrams. Typical operational problems and their solutions will be discussed. Exercises requiring calculations are utilized throughout the course. 

Who Should Attend

Process/Facilities engineers needing skills for design and troubleshooting of separators.


Troubleshooting Oil and Gas Processing Facilities

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will cover how to establish and apply a general troubleshooting methodology as well as how to conduct process/equipment specific troubleshooting. Definitions of good/normal performance will be discussed for each process/equipment type covered. Data gathering, validation and utilization procedures will be discussed. Criteria to use when evaluating possible problem solutions will also be covered. Real-world exercises will be utilized throughout the class to reinforce the learning objectives. Both onshore and offshore facilities will be discussed. It is assumed that course participants have a solid understanding of how typical oil and gas production and processing facilities work, including the commonly used processes and equipment involved.

Who Should Attend

Process/Facilities engineers with 5-10 years of experience, Facilities Engineering team leaders/supervisors, Senior Facilities operational personnel.


CO2 Surface Facilities

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course emphasizes the affect of carbon dioxide on the selection and operation of equipment (separators, compressors, and dehydrators), as well as sweetening process equipment. This course, assists those working with carbon dioxide or high carbon dioxide content natural gas. This course is particularly applicable to those persons who operate and/or design enhanced oil recovery (EOR) facilities using CO2 as a miscible agent. 

Physical and thermodynamic property data for carbon dioxide/natural gas mixtures are discussed. Calculations are performed to illustrate principles and techniques. 

Who Should Attend

Engineers and senior operating personnel involved with carbon dioxide/natural gas/CO2 EOR systems.

06) Gas Processing Courses
Gas Conditioning and Processing

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course deals with the practical planning, design, specification and operation of gas processing and production systems. The program is designed for both production and processing personnel. This course emphasizes the practical choice of equipment. Operating issues, performance evaluation and control systems are also discussed.

Who Should Attend

Production and processing personnel involved with natural gas and associated liquids to acquaint or reacquaint themselves with gas conditioning and processing unit operations. This course is for facilities engineers, process engineers, operations personnel, field supervisors and others that select, design, install, evaluate or operate gas processing plants and related facilities. 


Gas Conditioning and Processing: LNG Emphasis

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

The course includes in-depth information on basic LNG gas conditioning and processing. Instructors will explain the acid gas removal processes employed in LNG processes. Relevant details of both the mixed refrigerant and cascade processes in LNG liquefaction are described. 

Who Should Attend

Personnel involved with natural gas processing and LNG production, as well as anyone interested in a solid understanding of the principles of an LNG plant.


LNG: Technology and the LNG Chain

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This LNG course is designed for participants requiring moderate technical coverage coupled with information on LNG commerce and all parts of the LNG Value Chain. This course covers: 

  • Key commercial issues 
  • Technical LNG basics, 
  • Facility operation topics, 
  • Technical and design issues. 

Selected exercises and syndicates are used throughout the course that reinforce the main topics of LNG trade and technology. 

Who Should Attend
  • Commercial and managerial staff
  • Engineers new to the LNG industry
  • Operations supervision staff 
  • Senior Plant personnel 
  • Specialists looking to broaden their knowledge 
  • Staff involved in LNG commerce

Overview of Gas Processing: Non-Technical

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is designed for a broad non-technical audience. While the course is intended to be interactive and participatory, most technical calculations are eliminated and use of technical terminology is minimized. During this course participants will learn about Oil and gas facilities terminology, fundamentals of commercial and contract issues, key areas in oil and gas production surface facilities, non-technical fundamentals of technology and processes and various treatment processes and technologies that are selected for differing gas compositions.

Who Should Attend

General administration, supervisory, non-technical management personnel, as well as anyone that could benefit from a broad overview of important aspects of the gas processing industry.


Overview of Gas Processing: Technical

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is an overview of the gas conditioning and processing industry. Natural Gas and World Energy Trends, Natural Gas, Gas Sweetening, Gas Hydrates and Dehydration, Phase Behavior and Phase Envelopes, Stabilization and Fractionation Concepts and Facilities, Gas Conditioning and NGL Extraction, Gas Processing Key Equipment and Support Systems and Specialty Processes in Gas Processing. This course is participative and interactive course that utilizes fundamental technical exercises and terminology to communicate key learning points.

Who Should Attend

As a wide ranging overview, it is suitable for “interested parties” more so than direct practitioners, such as geologists, reservoir engineers, line managers, sales and business development staff, related specialists such as environmental staff, operational staff, shift foremen, or those new to the industry such as entry-level engineers, as well as anyone interested in a general, technically oriented overview of the gas processing industry.


Process Safety Engineering

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides an overview of process safety engineering fundamentals for hydrocarbon processing facilities, with emphasis on the upstream oil & gas sector. The focus of this course is on the engineering/design aspects of Process Safety Management. Frequent reference will be made to historical incidents and recurring problem areas. Techniques for analyzing and mitigating process safety hazards applicable to oil and gas processing will be reviewed. Integration of the concepts covered to achieve a measured approach to Process Safety Engineering is a key aim of this course. 

Exercises and group projects will be utilized throughout the course to emphasize the key learning points.

Who Should Attend

Facilities, process and design engineers, as well as new safety/loss prevention engineers who require an overview of Process Safety Engineering


Advanced Applications in Gas Processing

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

A basic working knowledge of the commercial process simulation package being used will provide the best opportunity to achieve the learning objectives of this course. 

A comprehensive course exercise based on a typical gas processing facility which can be applied to either onshore or offshore facilities is used for this course. 

The problem is developed in stages and att the completion of the course the participant will have developed a process simulation model that includes a dew point control process, a mechanical refrigeration process with economizers, hydrate inhibition using MEG, and NGL liquid product stabilization with recycle.

Who Should Attend

Engineers needing an intensive training in natural gas processing and associated liquids recovery processes with emphasis on the use and benefits of a simulation package. 


Gas Treating and Sulfur Recovery

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course emphasizes process selection, practical operating issues, technical fundamentals, and integration of the sweetening facilities into the overall scheme of gas processing. Sulfur recovery and tail gas processes are also covered including standard Claus configurations, SuperClaus, EuroClaus, SCOT, etc. Special design and operation topics such as trace sulfur compound handling and the importance of H2S:CO2 ratio is covered. Related topics such as liquid product treating, corrosion, materials selection and NACE requirements will also be reviewed.

Who Should Attend

Production and processing personnel involved with natural gas treating and sulfur recovery requiring an understanding of the principles of these process operations. This course is for facilities engineers, process engineers, operations personnel, field supervisors and others who select, design, install, evaluate or operate gas sweetening and sulfur recovery facilities.

07) Drilling Courses
Basic Drilling Technology

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Equipment and procedures involved with drilling oil and gas wells are described for those who are interested in understanding the drilling process regardless of the academic background. In this course, the overall drilling process is presented along with definitions and descriptions of drilling equipment and various components are discussed in greater detail with explanations of the basic science concepts which guide these processes. Subjects include descriptions of drill bits, directional drilling, drilling fluids, solids control, cementing, casing, well bore stability, well control, measurement-while-drilling techniques, stuck pipe, lost circulation, and well bore hydraulics. Some technology enhancements are included to improve understanding of drilling operations for all participants, with or without a science background. An understanding of clay mineralogy helps understand well bore instability and drilling fluids. A discussion of pressure and pressure effects helps explain many of the procedures and problems associated with drilling wells. Rocks behave differently under pressure and understanding this behavior helps understand drilling performance. The art and science of drilling are explained in simple terms. 

Who Should Attend

Petroleum and production engineers, completion engineers, geoscientists, managers, technical supervisors, service and support personnel, entry level drilling engineers, drilling operations personnel, drilling office support staff.


Casing and Cementing

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course builds a firm foundation in the principles and practices of designing, planning and conducting successful casing and cement jobs. The course uses a process-based perspective that takes participants from initial casing depth and size selection, casing and liner design procedures, casing running practices, planning and executing primary cementing, through remedial cementing and plugging operations. In addition to the necessary technical information and procedures, the course is laced with considerable practical, experience-based content. 

Who Should Attend

Personnel responsible for planning, overseeing, and conducting casing and cementing operations; operator and service personnel


Coiled Tubing and Its Applications

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides an introduction to coiled tubing (CT) as a tool for workover and drilling and completion services. It includes an overview of CT extended-reach operations, typical field applications, the properties of CT, its manufacture, surface equipment required for downhole deployment, as well as discussion of downhole CT tools. A significant portion of the course covers CT mechanical performance, including working limits, buckling, and fatigue. A discussion of CT drilling technology and hydraulics is also included.

Who Should Attend

Engineers and others that are involved in the design of CT equipment or uses of CT field services.


Drilling Fluids Technology

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

The course is designed for engineers and field personnel involved in the planning and implementation of drilling programs. The seminar covers all aspects of drilling fluids technology, emphasizing both theory and practical application. Drilling is a complex operation requiring proper understanding of different technologies and disciplines. Today’s drilling personnel must have a working knowledge of drilling fluid in order to effectively drill a well. The course provides the fundamentals necessary to drill a well, whether it is a shallow well or a complex, high pressure well.

Who Should Attend
  • Drilling supervisors
  • Drilling engineers
  • Tool pushers
  • Managers and 
  • Technical support personnel involved with drilling operations in Oil & Gas Industries.

Drilling Practices

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

The course is designed for engineers and field personnel involved in the planning and implementation of drilling programs. It covers all aspects of drilling technology, emphasizing both theory and practical application. The course provides all the fundamentals necessary to drill a well whether it is a shallow well or a complex, high pressure well. Computer programs are used to design many aspects of the modern well and the course will provide the participants with the theory behind most programs along with practical implementation. 

Who Should Attend

Drilling supervisors, drilling engineers, toolpushers, managers and technical support personnel.


Fundamentals of Casing Design

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Casing design is an integral part of a drilling engineer’s work scope. This course provides a comprehensive overview of the design process, emphasizing the working stress approach currently used in the industry. On completion of this course, successful participants will be able to select casing points, identify tubular requirements and loads, and design and specify the required casing string. Through a combination of lecture and extensive hands-on examples, the fundamentals of casing design are imparted to the attendees. Estimation of standard and special loads is covered in detail. Standard theories of strength and failure are discussed as well as advanced considerations for combined loads. In addition safe handling, running, and hanging practices are covered. 

Who Should Attend

Drilling engineers, service personnel involved in developing well plans, and managers interested in learning about the well design process.


Intelligent Well Technology

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course presents the basic knowledge and fundamentals of intelligent well completions needed to identify, plan, and execute smart-well and smart-field projects. Participants will gain an understanding of the petroleum engineering considerations for intelligent well applications such as project screening, well performance modeling and reservoir simulation. They will also learn about the equipment, functionality, completion design and execution needed to successfully implement the project.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for reservoir, production, drilling and completion engineers, managers and other personnel who are interested in learning about intelligent well technology and its potential applications.


Introduction to Drilling with Casing Technology

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This fundamental course begins with an introduction to the DwC industry, key benefits of the technology, and the primary DwC systems employed by various operators. This is followed by selection of equipment for setting up a competent DwC system comprising of surface casing drive and handling equipment and downhole components. Various engineering calculations will also be discussed. 

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for drilling engineers, drilling manager and field engineers who have limited exposure to drilling with casing technology or those professionals that are considering using this technology in future wells.


Introduction to Managed Pressure Drilling

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides a solid introduction to Managed Pressure Drilling (MPD), an adaptive drilling process that allows greater control of the annular pressure profile throughout the wellbore. Participants will learn the variables involved in MPD operations, including the selection of the equipment and the various aspects of safety and operations.

Who Should Attend

This course is appropriate for those who are new to the industry, or anyone who would like to understand the value of this important drilling technology.


Introduction to Under-balanced Drilling

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course covers the integrated technologies involved in underbalanced drilling. Participants will learn the operation of an underbalanced drilling project and be able to make informed selections of the equipment that is required. During this course participants will learn about: Objectives, limitations and advantages of under-balanced drilling, Selecting the right technique (air, mist, foam, aerated/gasified or single phase), Drilling fluid systems and surface equipment for under-balanced drilling, Reservoir studies, Completing under-balanced-drilled wells; Health, safety and environmental Issues and Case studies.

Who Should Attend

The course is designed for all personnel involved in underbalanced drilling, including: 

  • Onshore and Offshore managers, 
  • Wellsite engineers, 
  • Wellsite supervisors and 
  • Operations engineers.

Primary Cementing: Cementing I

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Cementing is a key factor in the well construction plan. The base cement used in the designing of cement slurries may or may not be API class cement. The operating company and the service company personnel should have a good working knowledge of cement slurry design, cement additives, and placement procedures. The majority of the operating companies do not have cement testing laboratories, therefore the laboratory testing is conducted by service companies. 

This course is designed to give a good understanding of how the cement slurries are tested and under what conditions depending on given well parameters. This course will also cover casing hardware (both internal and external), cement blending, cement additive blending (dry and/or liquid), on-site mixing equipment and job execution on location. During this course participants will learn about: Basic cements, Cement additives, Laboratory testing, Casing hardware, Blending equipment, Mixing equipment, Primary cementing, Remedial cementing, Plug cementing.

Who Should Attend

Operating and service company personnel responsible for:

  • Planning
  • Designing
  • Laboratory testing 
  • Overseeing and 
  • Executing cementing operations

Shale Selection, Completions, Fracturing and Production

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

The technology for recovering oil and gas reserves from shale is changing the face of the industry worldwide. Taking such issues in considerations this course acquaints participants with the basics of oil and gas shale evaluation and current shale selection, well completion, fracturing, and production technologies for shale reservoirs. The interactive format includes field data, current approaches and use of technologies suited for shale developments. Technologies include logging, frac interval selection, multistage fracturing in horizontal wells, and a summary of field data from many shale plays.

During this course participants will learn about: Candidate selection criteria to identify shale “sweet spots”, Complex fractures and role of geo-mechanics, Well orientation, optimum length and perf cluster design, Optimizing well completions and stimulations, Fracturing risk estimation: strengths and areas to improve; Water sources, treatment, reuse and disposal, Predicting production, estimating decline and well start-up suggestions; Surface equipment and production operations.

Who Should Attend

This course is for all well completion and production: 

  • Engineers, 
  • Managers and 
  • Geologists working with shale reserves.

Stuck Pipe Prevention

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

The Stuck Pipe Prevention - Train Wreck Avoidance workshop provides the most comprehensive coverage in the industry for understanding and preventing the underlying causes of Stuck Pipe, Wellbore Instability, Loss Circulation, and other sources of non-productive time (NPT) in drilling operations. The workshop also focuses on correct responses by individuals and teams, early warning signs, and minimizing the impact to drilling operations. Through world-class presentations, practical discussion, and the best reference and instructional materials available, delegates hone their knowledge of basic drilling technology and how it relates to avoiding NPT.

Who Should Attend

Entire drilling and completions team, including operator, drilling contractor, and service companies. 


Well Design and Engineering

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Well Design and Engineering integrates all major well design technologies from pre-spud to TD. Participants are actively engaged in every aspect of the technical activities required to deliver a cost-effective well plan while also gaining valuable perspective on how the overall process should be managed in a dynamic team environment. The content of this course is often customized to address technologies and practices that may be specific to a project or operational situation. 

During this course participants will learn about: Trajectory design, Wellbore stability and casing point selection, Drilling fluids and solids control, Casing design, Primary cementing, Drill string and BHA design, Bit technology, Circulating system hydraulics and hole cleaning.

After completing this course participants will be able to identify trajectory design issues and their influence on torque and drag, wellbore stability, and future intervention while being able to develop specific casing design skills including casing point selection; design load case development; burst, collapse and tension calculations; controlling load and safety factor determination and select appropriate size, weight and grade.

Who Should Attend

Drilling engineers, completion engineers, and drilling supervisors involved with drilling operations and well planning


Well Test Analysis and Design

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Many operators who run bottom-hole pressure tests (BHP) do not understand what the tests are used for, and the factors that may affect the quality of BHP data. This has often resulted in some tests being invalidated or becoming almost useless to the company it is being run for despite huge sums of money spent on getting the data. The objective of this course is to teach participants the appropriate procedures for BHP surveys and analysis, and the role of each group involved in BHP test. During this course participants will learn about: Purpose and types of BHP surveys, BHP survey equipment, Ideal conditions for running tests and correct procedures for conduction tests, Field practices and other factors that affect tests, Examples of good and bad tests.

Who Should Attend

Wireline operators, BHP survey supervisors, engineers and technicians who need insight into BHP surveys and analysis.


Casing and Tubing Design

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course covers all the relevant subjects needed to understand the structural mechanics of downhole tubulars. Discussions begin with the fundamental design principles and progresses through materials, performance, loads and design. Participants will also learn to calculate tension, compression, burst collapse, yield and threshold strength.

Who Should Attend

This course is for drilling and completion engineers, and drilling supervisors who want additional insight into casing and tubing design.


Cementing Practices: Cementing II

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

Cementing is a very important phase of the well construction plan. Operating company personnel must have a good working knowledge of cements, cementing additives and placement procedures. This course covers the importance being placed on the cement sheath integrity during the life of the well, requiring additional mechanical properties of the set cement be obtained other than the compressive strength. The parameters that the cement sheath will be subjected to must be considered. There are a number of joint industry projects addressing this area of work. The course covers the use of cement formulations, cement additives, casing hardware, cement blending, on-site mixing equipment and a well-planned job procedure. Cementing guidelines will be covered that aid in overall job performance.

During this course participants will learn about: The overall cementing operation, Primary cementing, Remedial cementing, Plug cementing, The use of cement additives, Laboratory testing, Casing hardware, Cement sheath integrity, Cement sheath evaluation, Mixing equipment, Special cement systems, Cement guidelines and Current documents.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for operating company and service company personnel responsible for planning, overseeing, and executing cementing operations.


Directional, Horizontal, and Multilateral Drilling

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course builds a firm foundation in the principles and practices of directional drilling, calculations, and planning for directional and horizontal wells. Specific problems associated with directional/horizontal drilling such as torque, drag, hole cleaning, logging and drill string component design are included. Participants will receive instruction on planning and evaluating horizontal wells based on the objectives of the horizontal well. The basic applications and techniques for multi-lateral wells are covered in the course. Additionally, they will become familiar with the tools and techniques used in directional drilling such as survey instruments, bottomhole assemblies, motors, steerable motors and steerable rotary systems. Participants will be able to predict wellbore path based on historical data and determine the requirements to hit the target. During this course participants will learn about: Cementing, Applications for directional drilling, Directional profiles, Extended reach wells, Survey calculations and accuracy, Dogleg severity calculations and problems associated with doglegs, Planning directional and horizontal wells, Horizontal drilling methods and applications, Logging high angle wells, Hole-cleaning, Multi-laterals, Types of survey instruments, Tools used to deflect a wellbore, Torque and drag calculations.

Who Should Attend

Drilling, production and operations engineers, field supervisors, toolpushers, managers & technical support personnel.


Drill String Design and Optimization

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course reflects the latest technology applications for both near-vertical and high-angle well designs while maintaining a thorough grounding in the fundamentals. 

During this course participants will learn about: Drill String and BHA failure prevention, Low-Angle design applications, High-Angle design applications; Torque, drag, and casing wear mitigation, Vibration monitoring and avoidance, Drill string handling and inspection. 

After completing this course participants will be able to place the drill string design process in context with other planning and operational considerations; Design cost-effective BHAs; Gain specific application experience analyzing common load cases for both near-vertical and high-angle situations: Tension loads, Torque loads, Combined tension-torque loads, Fatigue loads, Buckling loads; Identify drilling tools and operational practices to reduce both torque and drag and casing wear; refresh underlying physics of drill string failures and mechanical properties of drill string materials; diagnose and mitigate vibration to reduce drill string damage and failure; optimize drill string inspection program using the latest industry standards.

Who Should Attend

Operator, drilling contractor and service company engineers, drilling supervisors and superintendents. 


Geomechanical Aspects in CO2 Storage

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is an overview of the essential geomechanical aspects to consider when assessing the suitability of a carbon storage site and maintaining the site safely over time. Participants will gain an understanding of the many factors that can affect the well, reservoir and caprock integrity of potential geological carbon storage sites. During this course participants will learn about: Basic concepts of stress and strain, including mechanical and acoustic properties, rock strength, pore pressure and in-situ stresses; Geomechanical responses to CO2 injection; Effective reservoir monitoring, including injection-induced microseismicity, and techniques for monitoring ground and subsurface deformations.

Who Should Attend

This course is for engineers , researchers, geoscientists, technologists, and regulators involved in CO2 sequestration.


Horizontal Well Completions

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course develops strategies for completing horizontal wells. It covers both cased-hole and open-hole configurations, either with or without sand control. Participants will learn the applications and dynamics of horizontal wells, including drill-in fluids, hole displacement, cementing, perforating, and stimulation. They will also learn the guidelines for selecting stand-alone screens and executing horizontal gravel packs. During this course participants will learn about: Completion options, Cased-hole horizontal completions, Perforating and stimulating horizontal wells, Open-hole horizontal completions, Drill-in fluids, Zonal isolation and inflow control, Displacing the drill-in fluid.

Who Should Attend

This course is designed for drilling, completion & reservoir engineers, and for service company personnel involved with planning, drilling, completing & operating horizontal wells.


Managing Wellsite Operations

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

Managing Wellsite Operations teaches participants to apply organizational learning processes, wellsite technical limits analysis and more efficient use of all resources at the wellsite. Participants will learn how to identify and mitigate hidden risks that often are overlooked during the planning, design and execution phases of a drilling operation. The participant will learn how to dissect and analyze an operational plan. In addition, applying operational innovations and advanced motion and time processes will lead to improved efficiency of wellsite rotary operations and individual wellsite tasks. Participants will be introduced to models, templates, techniques, and real case studies that can be used on the job. During this course participants will learn to build effective teams by using a case study and applying the skills of the company representative, drilling contractor and service company personnel. Critical issues are identified and analyzed to maximize safety and reduce drilling costs. Similarly, engineering, technical service, and drilling contract personnel learn to analyze inefficient practices at the wellsite and utilize their newfound skills to improve the operation. Drilling organizations are using new and complex drilling technology to maximize return on capital costs. Combine the known variables with the influx of inexperienced personnel in the planning, design, and execution phases and you have high cost and unsafe operations at the wellsite. Mastering the drilling operations at the wellsite will reduce costs, improve drilling budgets and maximize resources.

Who Should Attend

Operations managers, drilling managers, drilling superintendents, drilling supervisors, wellsite drilling engineers, rig managers, rig superintendents, contract drilling engineers


Practical Drilling Skills

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course teaches how to listen to the well, perform simple tests on the rig, and make proper decisions unique to each well. During this course participants will learn about: Interpretation of mud logger gas units, Determining pore pressure, On-site hydraulic optimization, Selecting proper bit loading for the fastest and cheapest hole, Interpreting pressure integrity tests; Hole problems (such as, stuck pipe, lost circulation, and ballooning), Borehole stability, Operating guidelines, Drilling fluid properties necessary to maximize drilling performance, Discussion of polymers in drilling fluids, Solids control equipment arrangement to assure best drilled solids removal.

Who Should Attend

Experienced people on drilling rigs who want to drill cheaper, specifically drilling rig personnel, drilling engineers, drilling rig supervisors, tool pushers, drilling managers, and service company personnel.


Reservoir Aspects of Horizontal and Multilateral Wells

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course includes discussion on practical issues and reservoir parameters of horizontal well projects. The topics include formation damage, drainage areas, well spacing, well reserves, and rate calculations using steady-state and pseudo steady-state methods. The course includes several field case histories and performance analysis of horizontal wells. During this course participants will learn about: Drilling methods and costs, Well spacing and drainage areas, Recovery factors and steady-state solutions, Case histories: coning applications, Fractured horizontal wells and Forecasting production.

Who Should Attend

This course is for reservoir, production, drilling, and completion engineers and managers.


Cement Evaluation and Remediation

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course examines methods for detecting fluid channels, voids and leaks, and how to repair them.  Poor cement coverage affects nearly every aspect of a well.  This course will give participants a better understanding of some critical well safety and integrity issues. It also covers the logging tools and technologies use to evaluate the integrity of the cement prior to initial completion or anytime during the life of the well.  

Who Should Attend

This course is for drilling and completion engineers, field supervisors, petroleum engineers, and geologists as well as managers and regulatory officials who need to understand what can go wrong with a cement job and how it can be repaired.


Modern Well Design

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course presents a unified approach to the well design process. It is an overview of the operational sequences, from spudding the well through drilling and completion, to startup and production. Participants will learn elementary rock mechanics and a simple way to analyze borehole stability. The information is then used to design a fracture gradient curve, which serves as input to the well design process. That is followed by a discussion of the potential for optimization. During this course participants will learn about: Methods for improving borehole stability; High-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT) wells; Hydraulic optimization and the interpretation of ballooning in deep wells; Deepwater, multilateral and long-reach wells; Well integrity issues with examples.

Who Should Attend

This course is for drilling and production engineers, drilling supervisors, exploration geologists, and others who work on oil and gas wells.


Shale Oil and Tight Oil Technologies

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is intended for those who are very familiar with reservoir evaluation and development concepts for conventional reservoirs but who are interested in learning more about the unique technologies applied to Shale Oil and Tight Oil. During this course participants will review critical issues impacting well productivity, and forecasting, that are often over-looked and gain insights on the test and techniques for estimating oil composition and volumes

Who Should Attend
  • Engineers,
  • Geologists, 
  • Managers, and technical support staff.
08) Mechanical Courses
Rotating Machinery Best Practices

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This is an intensive course providing a comprehensive overview of pumps, compressors, steam turbines, lubrication systems, seals and other machinery and practices related to rotating machinery. Best practices from a variety of rotating machinery topics, representing many years of collective experiences, are presented in this course. The focus is on equipment and system best practices- type, unit and station configuration, integration of these units in the process scheme and control strategy in upstream and midstream oil and gas facilities. The material of the course is applicable to all oil and gas field production facilities, refineries, pipelines, gas plants, marine applications and offshore systems.

Who Should Attend

Engineers, senior technicians and system operators designing, operating and maintaining rotating equipment in oil and gas facilities. 


Fundamentals of Pump and Compressor Systems

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides a comprehensive overview of pumps and compressor systems. The focus is on equipment selection - type, unit and station configuration, integration of these units in the process scheme and control strategy in upstream and midstream oil and gas facilities. The material of the course is applicable to field production facilities, pipelines, gas plants, and offshore systems.

Who Should Attend

Engineers, senior technicians and system operators designing, operating and maintaining pump and compressor systems in oil and gas facilities.


Piping Systems: Mechanical Design and Specification

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course for engineers and piping system designers reviews the key areas associated with the design of piping systems for oil and gas facilities. The course is focused on four areas: 

  • Codes and standards, 
  • Pipe materials and manufacture, 
  • Piping components, and 
  • Piping layout and design. 

Applicable piping codes for oil and gas facilities, pipe sizing calculations, pipe installation, and materials selection are an integral part of the course. 

Who Should Attend

Mechanical, facilities, plant or pipeline engineers and piping system designers who are involved in the design of in-plant piping systems for oil and gas facilities.


Process Plant Reliability and Maintenance Strategies

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is designed to teach Reliability Engineering skills as they apply to improving Process System Reliability and developing maintenance strategies. During this course participants will understand analysis methods to perform statistical analysis of failures, model system performance, and develop maintenance and reengineering strategies to improve overall performance.

Who Should Attend

Maintenance, engineering and operations personnel involved in improving reliability, availability, condition monitoring, and maintainability of process equipment and systems. Participants should have foundation skills in statistical analysis and reliability techniques for equipment.


Risk Based Inspection

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

The risk-based approach requires a systematic and integrated use of expertise from the different disciplines that impact plant integrity. These include design, materials selection, operating parameters and scenarios, and understanding of the current and future degradation mechanisms and of the risks involved. 

Risk-Based Methodologies enable the assessment of the likelihood and potential consequences of equipment failures. RBI (Risk-Based Inspection) provides companies the opportunity to prioritize their equipment for inspection; optimize inspection methods, frequencies and resources and develop specific equipment inspection plans. This results in improved safety, lower failure risk, fewer forced shutdowns, and reduced operational costs.

Who Should Attend

Inspection maintenance, production and other plant engineers and technicians responsible for the safe on-going operation of pressure containing equipment in oil and gas facilities.


Troubleshooting Rotating Equipment

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides a comprehensive understanding of rotating equipment failures and reliability. Condition monitoring techniques are discussed and evaluated. Scenarios involving common rotating equipment reliability issues: rotors, journal bearings and vibration, thrust bearings, balance drums, pump mechanical seals, compressor seals (liquid and dry gas) and auxiliary systems are presented. 

The material of the course is applicable to all oil and gas field production facilities, refineries, pipelines, gas plants, marine applications and offshore systems.

Who Should Attend

Maintenance, engineering and operations personnel involved in troubleshooting reliability, analysis, condition monitoring, and maintainability of rotating equipment and related systems.


Compressor Systems: Mechanical Design and Specification

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides basic knowledge of compressor types and associated auxiliary systems, mechanical design of equipment, operating and performance characteristics, control and monitoring systems, maintenance practices, and codes and standards. 

Who Should Attend

Mechanical, facilities, plant, or pipeline engineers and technicians needing an in-depth understanding of the different types of compressors.


Turbo-machinery Monitoring and Problem Analysis

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course focuses on defining the systems and subsystems that form the turbomachinery, the potential problems with these systems and subsystems, monitoring techniques for early detection of problems, and methods to analyze the monitored variables to detect potential problems or reconstruct reasons for failures. 

Who Should Attend

Experienced mechanical or facilities engineers and senior technicians needing an understanding of monitoring and troubleshooting turbomachinery.


Gas Turbines

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course focuses on defining the systems and subsystems that form the gas turbines; the potential problems with these systems and subsystems; monitoring techniques for early detection of problems; and methods to analyze the monitored variables to detect potential problems or reconstruct reasons for failures. 

Who Should Attend

Experienced mechanical or facilities engineers and senior technicians needing an understanding of operations, control, monitoring and troubleshooting gas turbines utilized in the oil and gas industry.

09) Production Courses
Hydraulic Fracturing - A Concise Overview

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course includes the fundamentals of hydraulic fracturing along with addressing the general process, the terminology, and many of the real-world problems—in a concise format. The overall emphasis is how hydraulic fracturing fits-in with, is impacted by, or impacts geologic concerns, reservoir engineering, and operations. It will provide a general familiarity with fundamentals of the complete hydraulic fracturing process. That is, why it works (or doesn’t), where is it applicable, and what to consider in order to improve.

Who Should Attend

The course is intended for engineering managers, petroleum engineers, geologists, geophysicists, reservoir engineers desiring general information about the process, and what it can do for them. 


Introduction to Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS)

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is an introduction to the emerging technology of Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS), and a historic look at the reasons behind the need for DTS and its usage to date. The course looks at how DTS technology has been applied and the reasons behind applying this technology. Such systems have found application in high-cost horizontal and multilateral wells where reentry with a logging tool is difficult if not impossible.

Who Should Attend

This course is for petroleum engineers, geologists and anyone else interested in learning more about DTS and the latest advances in the technology.


Introduction to Hydraulic Fracturing

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will provide introductory information on all aspects of knowledge relating to hydraulic fracturing, from the history of fracturing, design, execution, evaluation, and also recent advances in horizontal staged fracturing, which is widely used in unconventional resources like shale gas. 

Participants will obtain the understanding of design, execution and evaluation process of hydraulic fracturing and knowledge of the critical parameters dictating the success of hydraulic fracturing. The course will also cover the concept and difference between conventional and unconventional fracturing process.

Who Should Attend

The upstream O&G engineers/managers who have not been involved in hydraulic fracturing operations but would like to get some insight on this particular discipline.


Overview of Microseismic Imaging of Hydraulic Fracturing

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is a survey of microseismic imaging of hydraulic fracturing. It is designed to give the attendees a rudimentary understanding of this technology based on the science at its foundation, the means and methods by which it is carried out, and the benefits it brings to the users. Since this technology is interdisciplinary, combining geophysics, geology, and geomechanics with well completion technologies, the goal of the course is to give attendees the knowledge and realistic expectations of microseismic imaging of hydraulic fracturing. To this end attendees should expect to become knowledgeable and discerning users, evaluators, and questioners of those vending this technology.

Who Should Attend

Any oil and gas professional interested in hydraulic fracturing and diagnosis would benefit from this course.


Production Optimization using NODAL Analysis

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

NODAL analysis views the total producing system as a group of components potentially encompassing reservoir rock/irregularities, completions, vertical flow strings, restrictions, multilateral and branches. It will identify bottle necks and serves as a framework for the design of efficient field wide flow systems, including wells, artificial lift, gathering lines and manifolds. Together with reservoir simulation and analytical tools, nodal analysis is used in planning new field

development.

Who Should Attend

Production, operations, and reservoir engineers, production technologists, senior technicians and field supervisors with an engineering background.


Transient Well Testing

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is designed to teach state of-the-art design and interpretation of pressure transient testing through hands-on examples and exercises from oil and gas fields. 

The course describes the detailed process from well-testing selection and design to data acquisition, validation, and interpretations for different types of reservoirs. Information about the latest developments in pressure transient analysis such as testing under multiphase flow conditions, layered reservoirs, and numerical analysis.

Who Should Attend

This course is for production and reservoir engineers and Earth scientists involved in well and formation characterization and reservoir surveillance.


Artificial Lift Systems

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course will help develop a solid foundation in all forms of lift and the concepts of the selection process to maximize production and return on investment. Troubleshooting is an important part of artificial lift operations and several typical surveillance problems are solved. Participants learn how to design and troubleshoot rod pumping, continuous gas lift, and electric submersible pump systems. Other methods such as PCP, plunger lift, jet pump, hydraulic pump, and intermittent gas lift will also be addressed. With increased prices, more emphasis is placed on techniques to maximize production. New developments at various stages of application are also covered. 

Who Should Attend

This course is for production and field operations engineers, junior and senior petroleum engineers and field technicians as well as geoscientists and reservoir engineers.


Formation and Prevention of Oilfield Scale: From the Laboratory to the Field

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course introduces state-of-the-art oilfield scale management, with field examples to illustrate the basic science. 

This course draws very strongly on the extensive experience gained from the industry and underlying theory in an accessible manner along with concrete practical examples of how this knowledge is applied in the field. During this course participants will get knowledge of background to mineral scale formation in oilfields, scale prevention using chemical scale inhibitors, theory of scale inhibitor squeeze treatments, the design of field scale management programs and the impact of the reservoir on the field scaling problem. 

Who Should Attend

This course is for production technologists, engineers, oilfield chemists and anyone concerned with flow assurance issues. It is also useful for those who work in the service, scale inhibitor and sulphate industries.


Hydraulic Fracturing Fundamentals for Shale

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course covers the technical fundamentals of hydraulic fracture design treatments in shale reservoirs. 

During this course participants will be introduced to Shale reservoir characteristics, Well design and completion basics, Five Fracture treatment objectives, Hydraulic fracturing mechanics, Pre-treatment calibration tests and Fracturing fluid options and applications.

The primary focus is on actual field results, the practical data needed to plan a treatment, and the reasons treatment designs vary by company and by type of shale reservoir. 

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for those involved in the oil and gas industry who have little to no exposure to fracture treatment design but require additional information to help support or guide design and treatment activities.


Hydraulic Fracturing: Design and Treatment

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course covers the fundamental principles concerning how hydraulic fracturing treatments can be used to stimulate oil and gas wells. This course includes discussions on how to select wells for stimulation, what controls fracture propagation, fracture width, etc., how to develop data sets, and how to calculate fracture dimensions. During this course participants will get knowledge of Rock mechanics/in-situ stress aspects of fracturing, Reservoir aspects of fracturing, Fracture mechanics, Fracture design variables, Perforating for fracturing and Fracture diagnostics.

The course also covers information concerning fracturing fluids, propping agents, and how to design and pump successful fracturing treatments.

Who Should Attend

Production and completion engineers and field operations staff with basic to moderate knowledge or experience in designing, pumping or evaluating hydraulic fracture treatments can benefit from this course.


Hydraulic Fracturing/Pressure Analysis

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course presents the basics of analyzing fracturing pressure, including design parameters that can be determined, and the uses and limitations of such analysis for on-site design. During this course participants will get knowledge of In-situ stresses and fracture geometry, Determining closure pressure and analyzing pressure decline, Interruption of bottom-hole treating pressure, Fluid efficiency and the fluid loss coefficient, pressure vs. fracture height growth-stress profile, Scheduling proppant and fluid from pressure decline data. Sessions include real-world examples from a variety of wells, from tight gas and shale to high permeability, offshore, and frac-pack treatments.

Who Should Attend

This course is for petroleum engineers who are involved, either directly or indirectly, in the design and  evaluation of hydraulic fracturing treatments.


Well Test Interpretation

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course examines the fundamentals of well test interpretation for oil and gas wells. It covers the analysis of tests in vertical and horizontal wells: drillstem tests, wireline formation tests, flow/build-up tests, injection/fall-off tests interference/pulse test. Determination of permeability and damage, estimation of stabilized flow rates from short tests, detection of boundaries etc. The practice of well test interpretation will be emphasized along with the theory. 

To this end, Data Validation and the PPD (Primary Pressure Derivative) will be used to illustrate Wellbore Dynamics, and extricate these effects from the reservoir response. The concepts will be presented graphically, thus keeping equations to a minimum. The practical aspects of the interpretation process will be highlighted.

Who Should Attend

Reservoir and production engineers. This course is also suitable for engineers new to well testing. 


Well Treatment and Stimulation

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This comprehensive course covers the full spectrum of well treatment and stimulation options for carbonate and sandstone reservoirs. It begins with a review of the various mechanisms that can damage a formation and ways to avoid them. Next, the discussion turns to acid systems for carbonate and sandstone formations, treatment design the selection of additives, and the use of coiled tubing in extended reach and multilateral wells. The course will end with an introduction to new technologies for carbonate acidizing. Case histories illustrate some of the treatment options.

Who Should Attend

This course is for production, drilling, completion and reservoir engineers who are responsible for enhancing the performance of wells.


Cased Hole and Production Log Evaluation 

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course covers wireline diagnostic techniques for the surveillance of cased wells.  During this course participants will learn about: Formation evaluation through casing, Well integrity - cement and casing inspection, Water identification and fluid movement in both injection and producing wells.

Who Should Attend

This course is for reservoir & production engineers and geologists, petrophysicists, log analysts and others involved in well surveillance, maximizing recovery, identifying production problems, planning workover operations or utilizing production information in reservoir studies.


Design and Optimization of Artificial Lift Systems 

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is an in-depth look at artificial lift, specifically for wells using continuous-flow gas lift or electrical submersible pumps (ESPs). During this course participants will get understanding of production systems, role of artificial lift in optimizing production, analysis and trouble shooting of continuous-flow gas lift systems, ESP with detailed pump, motor, cable and shroud designs, handling of gas and solids.

Who Should Attend

This course is for engineers who are involved in oil production and the design, maintenance and optimization of artificial lift, especially electrical submersible pump and continuous-flow gas lift systems.


Diagnosis and Practical Solutions for Wellbore Fluid- and Heat-Flow Problems

Advanced Level (39 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course examines the fluid flow and heat transfer that occurs down hole during the production of oil and gas.  During this course will understand fluid & heat-flow models, applications to fluid flow assurance and applications to the reservoir surveillance. Participants will learn how to compute the pressure and temperature profiles of single- and multi-string completions, and for both conduits of gas-lift wells. These basic principles will then be extended to tackle flow assurance and reservoir surveillance problems using examples from the field. 

Who Should Attend

This course is designed for production, reservoir and flow-assurance engineers who are involved in the development of oil or gas reserves and the simulation of integrated systems.

10) Instrumentation & Electrical Courses
Electrical Engineering Fundamentals for Facilities Engineers

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course applies fundamental electrical engineering principles to oil and gas facilities design and operation. Through the use of individual and group problem solving, attendees will learn about transformers, motors, generators, one-line diagram interpretation, protection and coordination of electrical equipment, emergency power, site and standby generation, electrical safety, and hazardous areas. Participants will gain a better understanding of electrical components and systems and will develop a greater appreciation for electrical engineering.

Who Should Attend

Facilities and Project Engineers as well as new Instrumentation, Controls and Electrical Engineers who need to improve their basic understanding of electrical systems within oil and gas facilities.


Instrumentation and Controls Fundamentals for Facilities Engineers

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course applies fundamental instrumentation and control engineering principles to oil and gas facilities design and operation. Through the use of individual and group problem solving, attendees will learn about field measurement devices, final elements and actuators, pressure relief and regulation, documentation, programmable logic controllers, power supplies, SCADA, DCS, SIS, hazardous areas, and installation methods. Participants will gain a better understanding of instrumentation and control components and systems and will gain a greater appreciation for instrumentation and control engineering.

Who Should Attend

Facilities and Project Engineers as well as newly graduated Electrical, Controls and Instrument Engineers who need to improve their basic understanding of instrumentation and control systems within oil and gas facilities.


Instrumentation, Controls and Electrical Systems for Facilities Engineers

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides an overview of electrical power generation and distribution, process and safety systems instrumentation, and control strategies and configurations. During this course the focus is on teaching participants about practical application and integration into the process and control of upstream and midstream oil and gas facilities. The material of the course is applicable to field production facilities, pipelines, gas plants, and offshore systems.

Who Should Attend

Managers, engineers, technicians and system operators requiring a broad understanding of instrumentation, control, and electrical systems in oil and gas facilities.


Flow and Level Custody Measurement

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is designed to acquaint users with the problems and solutions associated with the need for high accuracy transfer of liquid and gas petroleum products from supplier to customer. These needs have been brought about by major changes in manufacturing processes and because of several dramatic circumstantial changes such as: the increase in the cost of fuel and raw materials; the need to minimise pollution; and the increasing pressures being brought to bear in order to adhere to the requirements for health and safety.

Who Should Attend

This course is specifically tailored for any personnel who are, or will be, responsible for designing, selecting, sizing, specifying, installing, testing, operating and maintaining instrumentation related to the field of custody level and flow transfer measurement. This could include facilities, process, chemical, electrical, instrumentation, maintenance, and mechanical engineers and technicians.


PLC and SCADA Technologies

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This workshop provides engineers and technicians with the basic theoretical and practical understanding of PLC and SCADA systems. It traces the evolution of the PLC as an intelligent ‘black box’ replacement for the relay panel and how, with the advent of modern communications architectures, it is combined with supervisory control systems to allow stand-alone control systems to be configured. Throughout the course, participants will learn through active participation using exercises and questionnaires covering: basic ladder logic programming; hardware diagnostics; and implementation of various communication strategies.

Who Should Attend

Instrumentation, electrical and process engineers and technicians involved in selecting, sizing, specifying, installing, testing, operating and maintaining programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and supervisory (SCADA) systems


Regulatory Control and PID Loop Tuning

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides instrumentation, automation and process engineers and technicians with the basic theoretical and practical understanding of regulatory control systems and how this can be applied to optimize process control in terms of quality, safety, flexibility and costs. Participants will learn through active participation using exercises, questionnaires, and a series of  practical simulation sessions covering: process reaction; tuning methods; diagnostic tools; affect of different algorithms; surge tank level control; analysis of such problems as valve hysteresis, stiction and non-linearities and the impact on controllability; and integral windup.

Who Should Attend

Instrumentation, automation and process engineers and technicians involved in specifying, installing, testing, tuning, operating and maintaining regulatory PID control systems.


Valve and Actuator Technologies

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides a total in-depth insight into valve and actuator technology covering: control valves, check valves, shut-off valves, solenoid valves, and pressure relief valves. A methodology is presented to ensure the optimum selection of size, choice of body and trim materials, components, and ancillaries. Whilst studying both liquid and gas valve sizing, participants will also learn the correct procedures for calculating the spring ‘wind-up’ or ‘bench set’. Maintenance issues also include: testing for dead-band/hysteresis, stick-slip and non-linearity; on-line diagnostics; and signature analysis. During this course, participants will learn through active participation using exercises, questionnaires, and practical sessions covering: systems choice; basic sizing calculations; computer-based sizing; and maintenance diagnostics.

Who Should Attend

Facilities, instrumentation, maintenance, and mechanical engineers, technicians, chemical and electrical involved in designing, selecting, sizing, specifying, installing, testing, operating & maintaining shutoff, pressure relief and control valves.

11) HSEQ Courses
Basics of HSE Management

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Recognition and proper management of health, safety and environmental risks is fundamental to all management and professional roles in the industry. This course aims to equip participants with the underpinning knowledge relating to the concepts of an effective HSE management system and the key elements required for successful implementation. The course is based upon a common HSE management system model and the program explains the basic elements and their interaction. 

Who Should Attend

For all staff in the oil & gas and petrochemicals industries requiring a basic awareness of health, safety and environmental (HSE) management systems including; Operations, Engineers, Supervisors, Project managers and aspiring HSE professionals. 


Basics of Safety

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Recognition of safety related risks is fundamental to all management and professional roles in industry. This course equips participants with basic principles of hazard recognition, and use of safety techniques and safety management. 

Who Should Attend

For all staff in the oil & gas and petrochemicals industries requiring a basic awareness of safety techniques and management including: operations, engineers, supervisors, project managers, safety representatives and non-safety HSE professionals. 


Basics of Health

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides an overview of health hazard identification, health risk assessment and the basics of health impact assessments. The course covers essential basic knowledge on ergonomics, human factors engineering, food and water hygiene, and thermal extremes. Other important issues covered include health and emergency response facilities, psychological and social impact and fitness for duty and how these relate to the oil and gas industry. During this course participants will learn about Health Risk Assessment, Health Impact Assessment, Human factors engineering, Ergonomics, Health and medical emergency facilities, Fitness for duty, Food and water hygiene, Thermal extremes, Medical surveillance/industrial hygiene, Psychological and social agents.

Who Should Attend

Non-health professionals in the Oil & Gas and petrochemicals industries requiring a basic awareness of health, industrial hygiene and medical issues in the workplace. These personnel may include: HSE professionals, operations, managers, engineers, supervisors, project managers. 


Basics of Environment

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

Our program starts in advance of the taught course, as participants undertake a review of their own site’s environmental performance using documentation supplied to them. This sets the context for this course, which comprises a blended learning approach with tutorials, workshops, problem-solving and practical activities.  During this course participants will learn about Environmental Management, Environmental Audit, Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA), importance of Sustainability, principles and sources of environmental information, purpose and importance of setting environmental policy, main sources of water pollution and methods to reduce contamination of water sources, importance of techniques for minimizing waste, risks associated with contaminated land, potential sources and consequence of environmental noise and why emergency preparedness and response are necessary.

Who Should Attend

Staff in oil, gas and petrochemicals industries who require the basics of environmental management and pollution control, including operational staff, engineers, supervisors, project managers and entry level HSE professionals. It is a core course for any person who can influence environmental impact within their organisation; it is also an ideal program for anyone new to the industry with no prior environmental knowledge.This course is a first step on a career ladder towards a role within the environmental disciplines.


Applied HSE Management

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is about practising and applying HSE management for the oil & gas and petrochemicals industries. A rich variety of exercises, readings, videos and case studies are used to support the learning in realistic situations.  During this course participants will learn about Leadership & commitment, Policy & strategic objectives, Legislation & regulation; Organization, responsibilities &r resources, Professional training & behaviors, Risk assessment & management, Planning & procedures, Contractor controls, Security, Emergency response, Performance management, Incident reporting & investigation, Audit and Management review. After completing this course participants will be able to successfully apply the principle elements of an HSE management system. This course will enable participants shape and improve the safety culture of the organisation.

Who Should Attend
  • HSE Professionals, 
  • Operations, 
  • Engineers, 
  • Supervisors and Project managers and 
  • All staff who have the responsibility for designing, implementing, or supporting HSE management. 

This is a core course for persons in a supervisory role in an operational environment. Some prior knowledge of HSE management related topics is desirable but not essential.


Applied Safety

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course is about practising and applying safety tools, techniques and management for the oil & gas and petrochemicals industries. A rich variety of exercises, readings, videos and case studies are used to support the learning in realistic situations. These come together to “challenge” participants in the real life scenario of a fictional facility and concludes with the participants defending to the regulator why the company should maintain its operating licence.  After completing this course participants will be able to design and implement the principles and practice of safety technology. They will be able to apply factors relating to people, equipment, materials and the working environment to the establishment of safe working environments and identify common hazards and design and implement systems to control and monitor them.

Who Should Attend
  • HSE Professionals, 
  • Operations, 
  • Engineers, 
  • Supervisors and Project managers and
  • All staff who have the responsibility for designing, implementing, or supporting HSE management. 

This is a core course for persons in a supervisory role in an operational environment. Some prior knowledge of HSE management related topics is desirable but not essential.


Applied Health

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course builds on practical experience and learning on health and industrial hygiene, and intends to build skills to allow participants to be able to apply these techniques within their respective roles. During this course participants will study Health risk assessment, Health impact assessment, Human Factors Engineering, Ergonomics, Health & medical emergency facilities, Fitness for duty, Food and water hygiene, Thermal extremes, Medical surveillance/industrial hygiene, Psychological and social agents. The course is set in a fictitious, but highly realistic, case study based, where management needs assistance to develop a health management system. Application of other essential issues and how they relate to the oil and gas industry is also covered - ergonomics, human factors engineering, food and water hygiene, and thermal extremes. Other important issues which are covered include health and emergency response facilities, psychological and social impact and fitness for duty. 

Who Should Attend

For all staff who have the responsibility for designing, implementing and/or supporting health and industrial hygiene programs in the workplace in conjunction with professional health practitioners including: HSE professionals, managers, engineers, supervisors, project managers. Some prior knowledge of health related topics is desirable but not essential.


Applied Environment

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides opportunities to apply the tools, techniques and management systems of environmental management in petrochemicals industries. Participants work as a member of a team of environmental specialists to develop and improve the Environmental Management System and environmental performance of a fictitious but highly realistic case study. The course is designed to introduce participants to a range of environmental challenges, including policy development, conducting environmental reviews, tackling environmental issues including waste management, energy efficiency, pollution control and emergency planning, environmental monitoring and becoming an “agent for change” in their own organisations. During this course participants will learn about Effective application of Environmental Management Systems, Assessing environmental impact, Environmental risk management, Developing environmental improvement programs, Pollution control, Emergency preparedness and response, Environmental communication, Environmental performance monitoring, Environmental auditing, Environmental reporting and Management review.

Who Should Attend

This is a core course for persons with potential operational impact on the environment including environmental professionals, health and safety professionals wishing to broaden their skills, operational managers, engineers, supervisors, project managers and other staff.


Contractor Safety Management

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

An effective relationship between clients and contractors at all stages of the procurement / supply chain is essential for competently managing health and safety in a hydrocarbon (or any) facility. This course provides the practical processes for developing and managing a contractor safety management system covering all stages of the contracting cycle based around recognized management systems. During this course participants will learn about Supply chain strategy, Management systems, Pre-qualification, bidding, evaluation criteria, appointment; Communication and Supply chain performance monitoring, interviewing skills, auditing.

After completing this course participants will be able to Implement a contracting supply chain strategy based on an understanding of the risks and benefits of outsourcing low risk, high risk and specialist activities and prepare a program to initiate the use of competent contractors based on bid documents covering HSE and other relevant standards.

Who Should Attend
  • Project managers, 
  • Procurement and supply chain managers, 
  • HSE managers, 
  • HSE auditors, 
  • Engineers, and 
  • Supervisors who require an understanding of how to manage contractors.

Risk Based Process Safety Management

Basic Level (16 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course introduces the concepts of process safety management in the oil and gas industry, the elements and benefits of process safety management systems, and tools for implementing and managing a system. Process safety is vital to the oil and gas industry. 

A comprehensive process safety management system involves almost every function of a company: management, research, development, engineering, facility and process construction, operations, maintenance, human resources, information technology and the contractors used in the industry. In this course the participant will learn to use tools and techniques for managing process safety. 

Throughout the course, participants will be challenged to think how their process safety management system can be enhanced and modified to meet the concepts of risk-based decision making. An individual action plan will be developed to provide guidance in applying the information from the course to the workplace.

Who Should Attend
  • HSE professionals, 
  • Engineers, 
  • Supervisors and 
  • Project managers requiring a basic foundation in developing and managing process safety. 

Environmental Management Systems: A Development Workshop

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course provides the learning and comprehensive pre-built templates for developing and implementing an ISO 14001-based EMS for participants’ own facilities.  

During this course participants will learn Risk and the environment, Management systems and ISO 14001, Environmental policy and strategic vision, EMS planning - aspects, impacts, legal and other requirements; Resources and training; Communication, documentation and document control, Monitoring and measurement; EMS auditing and continual improvement.

Participants are encouraged to bring a site plan, and process flowcharts, which will be used in a series of hands-on exercises throughout the class. You will leave the class with a developed, draft EMS manual. The course includes all the documentation and materials necessary for preparing an EMS. 

Who Should Attend
  • Environmental managers, advisers and co-ordinators, 
  • Procurement and Supply Chain Managers, 
  • HSE Managers, 
  • HSE Auditors, 
  • Engineers and other managers and supervisors from large and small organizations who require the skills and support to develop a recognized environmental management system (EMS) for their organization.

GHG and CCS Regulatory and Legal Frameworks 

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course reviews the evolving regulatory and legal frameworks that will govern Green House Gases (GHG) and the emerging field of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). As with any industrial activity, CCS will require various operating rules. In this course, participants will gain an understanding of the broad legal framework that defines the day-to-day operating procedures of the industry.

Who Should Attend

This course is for oil and gas professionals, executives, managers, regulators and attorneys who need to understand the basic legal and regulatory framework that is shaping the emerging CCS industry.

Offshore and Onshore Oil Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

This course focuses on oil spill or discharge prevention and response to spill during oil well drilling, production, and work-over operations. Participants will learn about oil spill or discharge prevention, response to spill, spill containment, air and water monitoring, hazard evaluation and introduction to oil spill trajectory model simulation. Participants will also learn to develop a plan that meets legal regulations.

Who Should Attend

This course is for engineers, managers, technicians, and consultants responsible for designing and operating offshore and onshore drilling, production, or work-over facilities.


SHE Auditing: A Management Systems Approach

Intermediate Level (26 Weeks Duration)

Description

Participants work as a member of a team of internal auditors to appraise the Health, Safety and Environmental Management Systems (HSE-MS) of a fictitious but highly realistic case study. During this course participants will understand Learning and Development: Risk management and business control, HSE-MS Auditing, Planning the audit, Review and test processes, Effective interviewing for information, Legal aspects relevant to auditing, Findings and recommendations, Audit conclusion, Audit interviews, Gathering objective evidence, Preparing the audit report, Audit team meetings, Closing meeting, Audit report and follow-up. The class is based firmly in the principles of corporate responsibility for risk management and business control, and the theory and practice of modern risk-based auditing.  After completing this course participants will be able to participate effectively in an audit or review team in line with the standards of the auditing profession.

Who Should Attend

Experienced environmental managers and advisors. The participant will have responsibility for managing one or more environmental impacts within his/her work.

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Accelerated Course

Construction, Testing and commissioning for Oil & Gas Field facilities including pipelines, trunk lines, process piping...

Accelerated Training Courses for Oil & Gas Industries


Our vision

JOS Training department’s vision is to be a regional leader in providing professional training and development courses for Oil & Gas Industries.

Our Mission

JOS mission is to build competent professionals for Oil & Gas Industries by delivering learning and development base on industrial proven experience and contemporary knowledge.

Our Objectives

JOS considers sale as the essential component for the success of our company, that’s why we define our objectives to achieve our strategic goals by:

  • To ensure that the skills, ability and potential of all our trainers developed and up to date.
  • To continually improve the quality of human resources through continuous training & development based on industry proven experience and contemporary knowledge to support Oil & Gas industries.
  • To support our staff to develop their skills and abilities and reach their potential and in doing so improve the effectiveness of the organization and the quality of the service we provide.
Overview
JOS offers wide range of Training Courses

From processing to pipeline, engineering to operations, JOS has proven industry experience to help manage the talent required to execute on your midstream assets. As a trusted advisor and emerging leader in the industry, we can help you tackle your operational challenges by improving your workforce.JOS can provide the highest quality, business relevant programs that span all technical processes, and give management assurance that they have the skilled people they need to maximize asset value. It offer added value to employees via new, broad-reaching courses that fill gaps, and deliver the ability to perform and be able to prove it. JOS has processes, tools, and people to create a holistic workforce development plan for your engineers, operators, and technicians. It offers industry approved course material delivered through instructor led training modules. with a strong and proven petroleum industry’s knowledge our experts will work with you to develop structured accelerated learning programs for your organization. 

JOS is willing to provide broader, deeper and more flexible solutions in the development and assurance of competent personnel. JOS has affiliations with leading Training & Development Services providers in the industry. It can offer broad range of professional courses tailored for petroleum industry professionals. Proceeding pages provide summarized details of wide range of some training courses which JOS can offer to improve productivity of your organization by improving your professional workforce. Based on industry’s growing needs, JOS can offer new courses or custom tailored solutions for your speicifc professional needs. 

JOS offers training for 5-15 participants per training course in English Language. Training duration of our Accelerated Courses is 52 weeks.

Click on following desired training course to reveal its content:

Gas Processing
Gas Processing 

(52 Weeks Duration)

Description 

The Gas Processing Progression covers equipment and processes primarily focused on the handling of natural gas and its associated liquids. The wellhead is the starting point, ending with delivery of the processed gas, meeting the required

specifications, into a sales gas or reinjection pipeline. The NGL may be fractionated into individual specification products or sold as a mix for fractionation elsewhere. Waste by-products are disposed of in accordance with the applicable regulatory requirements. Main topics covered include: fundamentals, natural gas characterization, phase behavior, vapor–liquid equilibrium, basic thermodynamics, and water–hydrocarbon behavior and all the key equipment to process natural gas. 

Training Modules Includes:
  • Gas Conditioning and Processing
  • Gas Treating and Sulfur Recovery
  • Troubleshooting Oil and Gas Processing Facilities
  • Process Utility Systems
  • Fundamentals of Pump & Compressor Systems in Oil and Gas Facilities
  • Piping Systems: Mechanical Design and Specification
  • Process Safety Engineering
  • Corrosion Management in Production/Processing Operations
  • Onshore Gas Gathering Systems: Design & Operation
  • Heat Transfer Equipment
  • Relief and Flare Systems
  • Instrumentation, Controls & Electrical Systems for Facilities Engineers
  • Project Management for Engineering and Construction
  • CO2 Surface Facilities
  • Overview of Offshore Systems
  • LNG: Technology and the LNG Chain
Process Facilities
Process Facilities 

(52 Weeks Duration)

Description

Process Facilities separate the well stream into three phases - oil, gas and water and process these phases into marketable products or dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. Gas handling/processing facilities are a major part of Process Facilities, and are covered in detail as Gas Processing elsewhere in this catalog. 

Process Facilities, as used here, will mainly include: Single-well, satellite & central tank batteries, including: Oil treating: Stabilization, Separation equipment, Desalting - Storage, Produced-water treating facilities, , Water injection facilities, Offshore topsides facilities and Corrosion management.

Training Modules Includes:
  • Oil Production & Processing Facilities
  • Instrumentation, Controls & Electrical Systems for Facilities Engineers
  • Process Utility Systems
  • Gas Conditioning and Processing
  • Process Safety Engineering
  • Piping Systems: Mechanical Design & Specification
  • Relief and Flare Systems
  • Corrosion Management in Production/Processing Operations
  • Fundamentals of Pump & Compressor Systems in Oil and Gas Facilities
  • Onshore Gas Gathering Systems: Design & Operation
  • CO2 Surface Facilities
  • Overview of Offshore Systems
  • Project Management for Engineering and Construction
Offshore Engineering
Offshore Engineering 

(52 Weeks Duration)

Description

JOS provides technical training and consulting for the complete life-cycle of offshore oil and gas systems; from exploration and development to decommissioning. The curriculum includes courses that provide attendees the knowledge to understand and participate in evaluating the major offshore development alternatives: fixed structures, floating systems and subsea systems. Other key elements stressed in all offshore courses include life-cycle costs, constructability, operability and interface management. Offshore instructors have extensive real world experience managing offshore development projects, well construction and servicing, asset management and producing operations. Their broad knowledge blends the unique technical and operational issues of offshore into an integrated approach to enhance understanding of the full scope of offshore facilities.

Training Modules Includes:
  • Fundamentals of Offshore Systems: Design and Construction
  • Instrumentation, Controls & Electrical Systems for Facilities Engineers
  • Process Utility Systems
  • Relief and Flare Systems
  • Piping Systems: Mechanical Design & Specification
  • Gas Conditioning And Processing
  • Fundamentals of Subsea Systems
  • Fundamentals of Pump and Compressor Systems
  • Oil Production And Processing Facilities
  • Process Safety Engineering
  • Fundamentals of Onshore and Offshore Pipeline Systems
  • Project Management for Engineering and Construction
  • Corrosion Management in Production/Processing Operations
Pipeline Engineering
Pipeline Engineering

(52 Weeks Duration)

Description

JOS provides technical training and consulting for oil and gas transportation, focusing on pipeline systems as well as onshore infrastructure systems that support oil and gas operations. The curriculum covers pipeline transportation systems, oil and gas terminal facilities, and the onshore infrastructure from regional considerations through design and construction of site-specific systems. As with all our training programs, these discipline areas integrate with the other technical, operations and HSE disciplines. The Instructors and Consultants that support the Pipeline discipline have extensive real world – global experience from conceptual development through operations. Their broad knowledge blends the unique technical and operational issues of pipeline systems that transport all types of fluids: from heavy oils to refined products to high pressure injection gas and water, into integrated systems. This global experience spans the pipeline industry from initial site selection through detailed design and construction of unique facilities.

Training Modules Includes:
  • Fundamentals of Onshore and Offshore Pipeline Systems
  • Piping Systems: Mechanical Design & Specification
  • Overview of Subsea Systems
  • Fundamentals of Pump and Compressor Systems
  • Process Safety Engineering
  • Corrosion Management in Production/Processing Operations
  • Onshore Gas Gathering Systems: Design and Operation
  • Overview of Offshore Systems
  • Terminals and storage Facilities
  • Oil Production and Processing Facilities
  • Instrumentation, Controls & Electrical Systems for Facilities Engineers
  • Gas Conditioning and Processing
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Construction Services

Construction, Testing and commissioning for Oil & Gas Field facilities including pipelines, trunk lines, process piping...

Construction Services


  • Construction, Testing and commissioning for Oil & Gas Field facilities including pipelines, trunk lines, process piping and facilities.
  • Oil and Gas Processing plant.
  • Crude oil and products storage tanks up to 500,000 barrels in capacity.
  • Construction and refurbishment of accommodation blocks suitable to desert conditions according to BS, ASTM, and ACI standards.
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Maintenance Services

Maintenance/Repair and Revamping works for Oil & Gas Field facilities such as Stationary and Rotating equipments, Separators...

Maintenance Services

  • Maintenance/Repair and Revamping works for Oil & Gas Field facilities such as Stationary and Rotating equipments, Separators, Desalination plant, Boilers, Skimmers, Dehydrators, Scrubbers, Gas Boots and Production Tanks, etc. and assorted equipments.
  • Repair / Maintenance of underground cross country pipeline up to 42 inch in diameter.
  • Maintenance of crude oil storage tanks and various product storage and utility tanks. Activities include repair and replacement of tank appurtenances, bottom plate and roof plate, supply of foam dam seal plate and weather shield for floating roof tanks, etc.
  • Maintenance / repair of oil / gas pipelines up to 42'' inside diameter.
  • Cleaning inspection of pipelines up to 42'' inside.
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Material Procurement

We are in position to provide & supply with different material such us: Piping & fitting in different material & grade...

Procurement Services

We are in position to provide & supply with different material such us:

  • Piping & fitting in different material & grade.
  • Gasket & sealing check.
  • Valves (Ball, Gate, etc.).
  • Insulations.

Note: material to be controlled by international standard & specification requirement such as API, ESMI, ASTM & B.S

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Design & Engineering

We can prepare the following document such us: Pipe and Instrument diagram, Flow diagram. Electrical cables connection...

Design & Engineering

We can prepare the following document such us:

  • Pipe and Instrument diagram, Flow diagram.
  • Piping layout.
  • Electrical cables connection & distribution.
  • Material List.
  • Project schedule and cost.
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Manpower Supply

We can provide the client with Manpower Supply to cover the operation end users. Our Manpower is well selected...

Manpower Supply

We can provide the client with Manpower Supply to cover the operation end users. Our Manpower is well selected around the world and supplied according to job description requirement with high standards complying with the Oil and Gas industries level.

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Catering Services

Our wide range of Catering (Food and Housekeeping) Services include: Purchase of all food and cleaning material...

Catering Services

Our wide range of Catering (Food and Housekeeping) Services include:

  • Purchase of all food and cleaning material.
  • Deliveries of food items and cleaning items to the camp by refrigerated trucks.
  • Preparation of 3 meals per day (Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner)
  • Cleaning Kitchens and Dining Rooms after every service.
  • Keep stores freezers and chillers clean at all time.
  • Provide laundry services as follow:
    • Wash and press personal and working clothese twice per week.
    • Wash bed sheets, pillow cases and towels twice per week.
  • Provide house keeping services as follows:
    • Clean beadroms and make beds once per day
    • Change and wash sheets pillow cases and towels twice per week or at every change of resident
    • Clean accomodation once per day
    • Provision of one soap bar and small box of soap powder every week
    • Clean blocks three times per day
    • Collection of light garbage around the builing daily.
    • Recurit catering personnel, pay wages, leave salaries, visas, food etc.
    • Provision of professional catering uniforms.
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Manpower List

Following is a list of wide range of Specialized Categories from which Jable Oilfield Services offers its Manpower Supply Services:

  • A/C Technician
  • Accountant
  • Administration Staff
  • Assistant Camp Boss
  • Auto Denter
  • Auto Electrician
  • Backhoe Operator
  • Boom truck Operator
  • Bus Driver
  • Cable shop Electrician
  • Cable Splicer
  • Camp boss
  • Camp maintenance
  • Car Painter
  • Carpenter
  • Civil Engineer
  • Civil Inspector
  • CNC Operator
  • Comm. Technician
  • Comm. Tower Rigger
  • Corrosion Engineer
  • Crane Operator
  • Diesel Mechanic
  • Document Controller
  • Driver
  • Electrical Engineer
  • Electrical Technician
  • Environmental specialist
  • Fire Alarm Technician
  • Fire Commander
  • Fire Engineer
  • Fire Safety Specialist
  • Fireman
  • Foreman Lineman
  • Foreman Welder
  • Gas Mechanic
  • H.E. Mechanic
  • Head of Travel Department
  • HSE Drilling Advisor
  • HSE Specialist
  • HSEMS Advisor
  • HSEMS Coordinator
  • Instrument Inspector
  • Instrument Technician
  • Laborer
  • Land Surveyor
  • Lineman
  • Material Controller
  • Material Specialist
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Mechanical Specialist
  • Painter
  • Photocopy Technician
  • Pipefitter
  • Piping Engineer
  • Piping Supervisor
  • Plumber
  • Project Engineer
  • Purchaser
  • Rotating Mechanic
  • Safety Engineer
  • Safety Officer
  • Safety Specialist
  • Skilled Labor
  • Sr. Civil Inspector
  • Sr. Diesel Mechanic
  • Sr. Environmental Advisor
  • Sr. Instrument Technician
  • Storekeeper
  • Tank & Vessel Inspector
  • Timesheet Coordinator
  • Training coordinator
  • Welders Plate and Pipe
  • Welding Foreman
  • Welding Technician
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jabel oilfield services is focused on providing quality-oriented solutions to its clients

Our Policies

It is the policy of Jabel Oil Services to provide its customers, competitive solutions. Following sections will help you understand why we do not compromise when it comes to achieving quality in our work.

HESQ Policies

Life is too important to be taken seriously. That’s why we put Safety First! JOS has established wide range of policies and procedures to minimize industrial hazards while protecting lives of JOE’s workforce and citizen.

  • Acidizing

    Acidizing

    Application

    • The pumping of any type of acid at all JOS operated concessions and field locations.

    Potential Hazards

    • Pressure
    • Toxic Fluids
    • Static Electricity
    • Pressure Testing

    Procedure

    • Acid zing operations are site specific, make sure you have standard operating procedure (SOP) for each operation

    Equipment spacing

    • Be aware of prevailing wind direction, keep people and equipment up wind if possible
    • Have at least 2 separate escape routes identified and marked
    • What’s above you? Any power lines for example?
    • Fire protection equipment
    • May need a fire truck* in attendance if pumping flammable / energized fluids
    • Have at least one continuous foam unit in attendance
    • Are fire hoses clean?
    • Is fluid flow acceptable?
    • Minimum two hoses deployed on hand.
    • Fire extinguishers deployed around the site, can everyone use them.
    • Are they the right type?

    Note: It can also be used in emergency if someone gets splashed with chemical, use to wash down

    General PPE, Chemical Mixing/Handling

    • Everyone charged with mixing/transfer of chemicals must wear rubber boots, aprons and gloves that are impervious( to privent ) to the chemical being handled
    • Carry out a chemical PPE assessment to determine the actual PPE to be worn and to identify any specific hazards of the job
    • Damaged/punctured PPE must be discarded (not to be used)
    • Anyone exposed to vapors must wear full face respirators with appropriate cartridges (i.e. rated for the specific chemical in use)
    • At least two eyewash stations must be available on site and at least one shower, make sure they have all been function tested and that the water quality is acceptable
    • Anyone exposed to the acid blend fluids during mixing/pumping must immediately remove PPE and clothing and then have a shower
    • All contaminated clothing must be discarded
    • Acid additives preferably bind (combined )to protein (i.e. skin, hair, leather etc) so when the work is completed PPE must be rinsed off and the individuals take a shower
    • Cordon off the area, erect warning signs banning unauthorized entry
    • There shall be no eating, drinking or smoking on/at the work site by anyone. Remove PPE and wash thoroughly before eating drinking or smoking

    References:

    • API Recommended Practice (RP) 54
    • JOS HSE Standards Manual
    • Hydrogen Sulfide Safety – H 006
    • Personal Protective Equipment – P 002
    • Electricity – E 002
    • Pressure Testing – P 008
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  • Asbestos

    Asbestos

    Purpose

    To communicate procedure associated with Asbestos Containing Material (ACM)

    Definition

    Any material containing over 1% asbestos estimated by volume is defined as Asbestos Containing Material (ACM)

    Potential Hazards

    Asbestos fibers, if advertently inhaled, can contribute to the development of associated lung diseases such as cancer and mesothelioma.

    Procedure

    • Prior to work being perform each worksite where ACM is present should develop a site specific asbestos handling procedure.
    • Insulation containing material not clearly identified as asbestos free (or equivalent wording) should either be treated as ACM or analyzed phase contrast microscopy to determine if asbestos is present in the material.

    Responsibility

    It is a responsibility of every supervisor to ensure protection steps against the potentials hazards above are implemented and carried out

    Control of Asbestos

    Worksite must be keep clean and free of asbestos dust accumulation it is prohibited to clean asbestos dust using compressed air stream. Personnel who carry out cleaning operation must wear appropriate PPE and respirator

    Asbestos Precaution
    • Bags used as asbestos container mustn’t be penetrable by asbestos fiber
    • Asbestos or asbestos waste except asbestos cement or its engaged material cannot be stored, distributed, or delivered without closed container
    • All container containing asbestos or asbestos waste must have sign; “Asbestos Containing Material do not Inhale “except asbestos cement products and asbestos which engaged by other material
    • Bags of asbestos must be disposed in a way so that it cannot be re-used
    • Asbestos waste must be disposed by dispersing evenly in the pit then filled out with soil at least 25 cm thick; or other approved practice.

    References

    • General industry standard 29 CFR –OSHA 1910.1001 asbestos.
    • Construction standard 29 CFR – OSHA 1926. 1101 asbestos.
    • 29CFR – OSHA 1910. 132 – Personal protective equipment.
    • 29CFR – OSHA 1910. 134 – Respiratory protection.
    • 40 CFR – NESHAPS delegations 40 CFR 61.
    • department of transportation-hazardous materials DOT 49 CFR 171-173
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  • Catering

    Catering

    Purpose

    • To contribute an enjoyable dining experience
    • To prevent injury or illness caused by catering activities throughout the JOS operations.
    • As standard procedures to handle food safely, healthy, environmental friendly, and efficiently.
    • To contribute an enjoyable dining experience.

    Application

    • Standards Manual applies to all personnel in JOS

    Definitions

    • Defrost: Make or become free of frost or ice
    • Reheating: To heat a food again so it will ready to serve.
    • Toast: To heat and brown (bread, for example) by placing in a toaster or an oven or close to a fire.
    • The Danger Zone: Condition in temperature between 4.5o to 60o C when bacteria grow most rapidly, doubling in number in as little as 20 minutes.
    • Pest: An annoying animal.
    • Insecticides: A chemical substance used to kill insects.
    • Rodenticides: A chemical substance used to kill rodents.
    • Liquors: Alcoholic beverage.
    • Freeze : The withdrawal of heat to change something from a liquid to a solid -18o to -5o C
    • Chill: A moderate but penetrating coldness 1o to 4o C.
    • Moldy: Contains any of various fungi that often cause disintegration of organic matter.
    • Refrigerator: An appliance, cabinet, or room for storing food or other substances at a low temperature.
    • Meat: The edible flesh of animals, especially that of mammals as opposed to that of fish or poultry
    • Poultry: Flesh of chickens or turkeys or ducks or geese rose for food.
    • Marinade: To soak meat, fowl, fish, or vegetables in a liquid mixture, usually of vinegar or wine and oil with various spices and herbs, before cooking.
    • Brining: To immerse, preserve, or pickle in salt water.
    • Leftover: Food remaining from a previous meal.
    • Disposal: The act or process of getting rid of something.
    • Influenza symptoms: experience of chills; fever (above 38C); muscle pain, sneezing, headache, soar throat, dry and hacking cough, chest pain.

    General

    • Roles and Responsibilities: The roles and responsibilities for ensuring high standards of safety, health and hygiene, at field catering facilities rest with the contractor-catering supervisor at the work site. However, the accountability lies with the Area Superintendent
    • Safety and Health Hazard: Safety and Health hazards, which are common to all these facilities, regardless of type, are caused by: harmful bacteria (protozoa), virus, chemical, pesticide, metal (lead, copper), poisonous plant, fires, disease, animals (e.g.: rats, cats, dogs, insects, worms), sharp objects. Avoid The Danger Zone, between 4.5o - 60o C.
    • Catering Personnel Hygiene: All catering personnel required to handle or prepare food shall be screened at recruitment regarding their past history and periodical return from day-off of any illnesses e.g.: typhoid, paratyphoid, diarrhea, dysentery, tuberculosis, hepatitis, skin diseases, and influenza symptoms. Catering personnel must report any illness to the Doctor on duty if he/she suffering from those diseases. Personnel with cut and/or long fingernails shall not be allowed to handle food.
    • Pest Control: All food must be protected from contamination by birds, insects, rodents, or other pets. Insecticides and rodenticides in required area must only be carried out by trained pest control personnel.
    • Cleaning of Facility: Kitchen and dining structural, and equipment surfaces must be constructed of washable materials (smooth impervious and easy to clean), which can be effectively cleaned from germs. No dusting or sweeping activities shall be carried out during food preparation and serving. Cleaning must be conducted in conjunction with handling instruction of cleansing agent provided by the manufacturer.
    • Prohibited Items: The following items are prohibited to serve in JOS operation: fresh crabs, fresh shells, fresh oysters, and liquors.

    Supply & Receving Material

    • Foodstuff must be delivered to receiving point in good quality. Food temperature, conditions and date code must be checked on the receipt of goods. Store Keeper is responsible for ensuring the quality of foodstuff upon receipt.
    • Discarded any meat or poultry that have off odor, sticky or tacky to the touch, or slimy.
    • Each meat and poultry must be delivered separately in a single plastic wrap.
    • Corroded, punctured, bulging, lead soldered and dent canned and expired foodstuffs are not accepted.
    • Foodstuff shall be delivered in the mode of freeze (meat, fish), dry (soft drink, rice, sugar, flour, noodles, etc.) and chill (vegetables, fruit, fresh milk, eggs) as per requirement. Do not freeze canned food or eggs in shell.
    • Transportation containers to deliver foodstuff shall be in good shape and condition (appropriate temperature, no dent, no corrosion).
    • Re-usable plastic baskets shall be used to deliver vegetables, fruits and eggs. No wooden boxes are acceptable. Re-use of carton boxes ex cleaning agents or lube oil for packing food is prohibited.
    • Eggs shall be washed thoroughly in 50 – 55 o C. prior to storing. Cracked egg shall be discarded.

    Storage

    • Storage must facilitate rotation of stock; the FIFO (First In First Out) principle must be followed at all time.
    • Food stock shall be separately stored from all other items (linen, disposable, cleaning material, stationery, pesticide, etc.). COSHH STORE
    • All raw food shall be separately stored from cooked and prepared food.
    • Keep all meat and poultry in its package until using. Discard any foods that have been contaminated by raw meat juices.
    • Keep food containers off the floor. (use Pallets)
    • Storage of dried and canned food must be dry, cool and well-lit, well -ventilated, pests proof, and kept clean and tidy. Deep freezers must only be used for frozen product. The freezer shall run at minus 18 deg Celsius, while chiller shall run at 4 deg Celsius. Freezer and chiller temperature must be monitored and recorded daily by Store Keeper. Avoid overfill of refrigerator, and never leave perishable goods out of the refrigerator over two hours.
    • Storage must be free of pest, contamination and corrosion.
    • All doors opening to the exterior of the chiller and/or refrigerator shall be flush fitting to prevent entry of pests.
    • Inside door opening must be fitted in all Walk-in Freezer and chiller.
    • All moldy food shall be immediately discarded from storage. Don’t sniff on them.

    Food Preparation

    • Personnel Hygiene
    • Bad habits such nose/ear picking, spitting, nail biting, finger licking, chatting, eating or drinking must be avoided at all time during food preparation and service areas.
    • Always wash hands with warm soapy water before and after preparing food for at least 30 second.
    • Use disposable tissue if coughing and sneezing, and always wash hands after coughing and sneezing into them.
    • Protective clothing (uniform and apron), glove, and cap must be worn and maintained in a clean condition.
    • Never touch food with bare hands, use disposable plastic gloves/utensils.
    • No Smoking

    Food

    • Thawing of frozen meat, poultry and fish slowly in the refrigerator for meat preparation instead of preheating or reheating. Never thaw at room temperature (22oC) neither use hot water.
    • Always marinate or brining food in the refrigerator, not in the counter. Never use leftover marinates or brine.
    • Meat, poultry, and fish must always be separated from sauce or stocks during cooling and refrigeration.
    • Don’t keep eggs out of refrigerator more than 2 hours.
    • Raw eggs dishes, cold dessert, and cold sauces made with raw eggs are forbidden.
    • Fresh vegetables and salad items must be thoroughly washed in cold water containing chlorine salad wash, according to manufacturers recommended dilution and left for 15 minutes. Inspect all items for traces of insects, caterpillars, slugs, or other foreign material. Cut away any damage or bruised area. Immediately refrigerate any fresh-cut items such as salad or fruit.
    • Use up milk, canned fruit/vegetables/juices, once the container is open.
    • Once the can is opened move the content to a clean container and refrigerate them promptly. Remove can lid completely. Do not put any kitchen utensils into the container.
    • Reheating of leftover food is not acceptable.
    • Clean all foods thoroughly.

    Equipment

    • Use plastic cutting board instead of wooden cutting board.
    • Use different cutting board and knife for meat, fish, vegetables, fruit, bread/cake and chili.
    • Clean all kitchen equipment including the cutting board and any utensils before and after preparing food. Use hot soapy water.
    • Disinfect cutting boards using a solution of 2 tsp of household bleach in 1 liter of hot water. Wash the board thoroughly after disinfecting.
    • Replace cutting board periodically
    • Don’t use the same platter and utensils for raw and cooked meat or poultry.
    • Use only electrical range stove that can reach more than 163o C.
    • Use a fresh solution of detergent/sanitizer before starting work on a preparation bench, between jobs on the same bench, at the end of the day, first thing in the next morning.
    • Use disposable paper towels for wiping, eliminating tea towels and similar fabrics.
    • Can openers must be kept clean and sterilized at least once per day.
    • Blades must be sharp free from damage, renewed as necessary and kept clean.
    • Food cans/containers must be washed thoroughly prior to opening.
    • Defect kitchen utensils shall not be used.
    • All kitchen utensils must be maintained and cleaned.
    • Use a wooden tamper when operating food choppers and meat grinders.
    • Cook red meat and eggs to 70o C, poultry 80o C, use a food thermometer to make sure the food has reached a safe internal temperature. Make sure to check temperature in the wing joint for poultry. To check visually, red meat is done when it is brown or grey inside, poultry juices run clear.
    • Cooking shall not be interrupted. Never refrigerate partially cooked product to later finish cooking on the grill or in the oven.
    • Bring sauces, soups, and gravy to boil.
    • Never taste

    Food Serving

    • Wash hands with soap and warm water before serving food.
    • Serve cooked products on clean plates with clean utensils.
    • Defective drinking or eating utensils must be discarded immediately.
    • Hot food shall be kept above 60o C until served.
    • Cold dish temperature must be below 5o C.
    • No superfluous decoration of food serving shall be used.
    • Do not share food, cups, straws and hand towels.
    • Do not put your forks, spoons, into communal dishes.

    Leftover & Disposal

    • Wash hands with warm and soapy water before and after handling leftovers.
    • Discard any food left out at room temperature (22o C) for more than 2 hour, 1 hour if the room temperature more than 32o C.
    • Clean and dirty items shall be handled separately.
    • Wash cycle temperature for washing machine is 49 – 60o C. The rinse cycle temperature is 66 - 82o C.
    • Never use wire wool to wash metal pot sauce
    • Use separate basins for washing and rinsing.
    • All kitchen garbage must be placed in covered containers, which have either plastic bin liners or plastic bags inside them.
    • Garbage shall be buried without the plastic bags in a prepared trench and covered with at least 50 yards from the kitchen and eating area.
    • Bio-degradable bags, incinerator

    Training

    • Area Superintendent is responsible to ensure that all catering staffs are trained.
    • In accordance with HSE STANDARDS MANUAL Section T003.

    Audit

    • Mechanism of catering audit/inspections conducted by JOS consists of Self (semiannually),
    • Weekly and impromptu. In addition to these inspections, the contractor management is required to conduct self-inspection between JOS Self audits.

    Food Posining Outbreak

    Complain on foreign body/unfit food shall be investigated and necessary action shall be taken. Food poisoning outbreak shall be investigated and the following action shall be taken:

    • Stop serving the suspected food
    • Isolate and take sample of the suspected food to the laboratory test

    Food Poisoning occurs 4-12 hours after ingestion (after the meal is served) The Area Superintendent shall obtain medical guidance to overcome the issue.

    References

    • Consumer Education and Information from US Department of Agriculture (USDA).
    • OSHA Standard No. 1910.1200
    • COSH (Control of Substances Hazardous to Health)
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  • Chemical Handling

    Chemical Handling, Usage and Labeling

    Potential Hazards

    • Hazardous Chemicals
    • Static Electricity
    • Combustible/Toxic Fluid
    • Corrosive
    • Human affects
    • personal injury
    • Heat

    Procedures

    Master Chemical Inventory List
    • Each site will conduct an inventory of chemicals that are under their control. The inventory will be conducted annually or when new sites become operational.
    • The master chemical list will be updated to include any new chemicals or in response to product name changes.
    • Unknown chemicals or chemicals not on the master list shall not be released until a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) can be obtained and reviewed. After reviewing the MSDS and training employees, the chemical may be released.
    • Chemicals that are no longer in use should be removed from the master list but retained until all of the chemical has been removed from the site
    Material Safety Data Sheet

    An MSDS is the basic reference source of safety and health information for chemicals in the workplace (OSHA 1910.1200). An MSDS for each chemical used in the workplace must be available to all employees and can be obtained from the chemical manufacturer.

    Each MSDS Must Contain the following:
    • Identity used on the label, including chemical and common names of material and ingredients, if a mixture.
    • Physical and chemical characteristics
    • Physical hazards (of the hazardous chemical), including any potential for fire, explosion, and reactivity.
    Health hazards, including:
    • Signs/symptoms of exposure
    • Permissible exposure limits
    • Primary routes of entry
    • Identity as a carcinogen, if applicable
    General applicable control measures:
    • Precautions for safe handling and use
    • Emergency and first aid procedures
    • Date of MSDS preparation or update
    • Contact information for MSDS preparer who can provide additional info
    Labeling
    • Labels must include the name of the hazardous material, appropriate warnings, managing used, surplus, out-of-date chemicals, chemical storage, the name and address of the manufacturer. The Supervisor is responsible for confirming ensuring that employees attach and maintain the appropriate label (s).
    Reference:
    • MSDS must be accompany chemical /substances when transferred to field operations
    • Every drum/bag/sack/bucket should have the following information stenciled (paper labels only are not acceptable) on its side: gross/net weight, product name, manufacturer’s name, chemical type (antifoam, scale inhibitor, etc.), manufacturer’s batch or quality control number, warning labels (paper label acceptable either on the drum or on a placard for pallected bags/sacks/buckets to indicate material as corrosive, flammable, etc.). For drums, the product name must also be stenciled on the top of the drum. A complete each pallet of drums/bags/sacks/bucket.
    • Bulk containers (stainless steel, Shutz-type, Tote, etc.) must contain the aforementioned information on a placard attached to the tank body. All valves must be protected from accidental rupture/damage, e.g. valve is inset with respect to the bulk tank body.
    • Additional signage for areas or tanks devoted to chemicals with like hazards may be required (e.g. flammable, caustic, poison signs). Site Managers and Supervisors shall check with their Safety Supervisor.
    The following labeling system will be used if the manufacturer’s label is insufficient:

    Attachment of JOS label will be done by the employee or Supervisor at the time of receiving material. The label will include:

    • Name of the product/chemical
    • Appropriate hazard warnings (this will denote as a minimum, the health, reactivity and fire hazards).
    • List of required protective equipment for employees working with the material.
    • When transferring a hazardous material from one container into another, the employee performing the transfer must apply a label on the new container noting the information from the original container. The employee performing the transfer is responsible for correctly completing and applying the label.
    • Contractors are responsible for assuring that all of their containers of materials are labeled properly. Contractors are informed about the provisions of this chemical handling program during pre-job contractor safety orientation meetings.

    Labeling Expectations

    • A hazardous chemical that was transferred from a labeled container into a portable container and which is intended for immediate use by the employee who performs the transfer. The container must be under the employees control and used immediately.
    • Containers that already have a label with the required information.
    • Any consumer product or substance when used in the workplace in the same manner as normal consumer use.
    • All drums/bags/sacks/buckets must be properly pallete/strapped and plastic wrapped to protect against the elements. For drums (200 liter or 55 USG), pallets should contain a maximum of four drums per pallet. Odd drums (the remaining one, two or three) should be centered on the pallet. For bags/sacks/buckets, pallets should contain a maximum of 20 x 50 kilograms or a maximum of 44 x 50 lbs. bags/sacks/buckets per pallet. Odd bags/sack/buckets should be centered on the same type pallet. When Operations require partial drums for the field (e.g. acid jobs, fracs, etc.), only the amount needed should be taken. For example, if the program calls for 16 gallons from a 55-gallon drum, take only that amount to the field/point of application in a chemically compatible and secure container (e.g. jerry can, bucket with sealing lid). Transfer of chemicals to smaller containers should be performed by trained persons utilizing proper equipment at the warehouse or storage area reducing the risk of contaminating an entire drum. All containers sent to the field or used within the field must be properly identified with a permanent label. Never place any other chemicals in small containers once it has been used. After the job, dispose of all small containers properly. Unused excess chemicals in small containers can be returned for storage but must be kept separate from main chemical stocks in the small container.
    • In acid jobs you are allowed a margin of error so attempts should be made to utilize whole units that are easily transferred to the field such as drums, buckets, sacks, five/three/two/one-gallon Jerry cans, etc. For instance, the mutual solvent can be between 4 to 5 % so if the calculations for the program calls for 63 gallons, just go with 55 or one complete unit. Once a chemical has been taken from its original container, never return it to its original container. The risk of contamination or even worse violent reaction is too great.
    • Never stick a common transfer pump suction tube into any drum you are going to re-seal. Pour-out the chemical you need. Never stick a contaminated suction hose into a drum, if you do not plan on using its entire contents. Should you need to transfer chemicals via a portable handheld drum transfer pump (offshore only), then have a dedicated pump for each specific chemical type.
    • No drums should be poured in the field (unless offshore). As stated above, all disbursement from an original container must be done in the warehouse or by qualified personnel offshore. That way all you do is tighten down the bung seal, when you are done. The drum still has its original label and will not need any special storage modifications. An open drum must be so identified and must be the first choice for disbursement for the next job

    Precautions

    • Extreme caution must be used when handling or using any chemical. Consult the product’s MSDS before handling/usage.
    • Selection of hand protection shall be based on evaluation of the task being performed, conditions present, duration of exposure, potential hazards identified, and performance characteristics of glove material. Refer to the location’s PPE Hazard Assessment.
    • Special precautions should be taken to avoid gloves being pulled into moving equipment.

    Training

    Employees working in areas where hazardous materials are or may be used will undergo the training for specific hazardous materials consisting of:

    • Review of MSDS for chemicals specific to their work environment.
    • Methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or release of a hazardous chemical in the work area.
    • The physical and health hazards of chemicals in the work area.
    • The measures that can be taken to protect employees from these hazards, such as appropriate work practices, emergency procedures, personal protective equipment, and engineering controls.
    • Detailed explanation of the labeling system and the Material Safety Data Sheet, and how employees can obtain and use the appropriate hazard information.
    • Employee training and understanding shall be certified in a written document containing the name of the employee trained, the date(s) of training, and identification of the subject of training.

    References

    • ANSI Z400.1
    • ANSI Z535.3
    • OSHA 1910.120
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  • Compressed Gas Cylinders

    Compressed Gas Cylinders

    Potential Hazards

    • Fire / Explosion
    • Burn injuries
    • Eye / Face injuries
    • Asphyxiation

    Procedures

    • Compressed gas contained in cylinders is potentially dangerous and should be treated with care. The following guidelines shall apply to all compressed gases in cylinders and in particular to oxygen, propane and dissolved acetylene.
    • The Compressed gas cylinders in use must be stored in an upright position and secured by the use of carts, racks, chains, straps, etc.
    • No fittings or equipment containing above 90% copper (except burner tip) shall be used with acetylene, as copper in contact with acetylene may form a dangerously explosive compound, copper acetylated.

    To avoid acetone carry-over from acetylene cylinders, the following points must be observed:

    • Discharge pressure shall not exceed 9 psi at the regulator
    • Settling periods as follows shall be strictly observed
    • 24 hours after unloading a cylinder from a supply boat or lorry.
    • 24 hours after moving a cylinder around the platform or terminal.
    • The use of lead washers or any kind of packing in the valve joints shall be forbidden. Packing, particularly lead or copper, tends to get forced into the orifice causing a blockage; its subsequent extraction is attended by grave risk.
    • Cylinders with faulty valve joints, stuck valve spindles, or valve leakage shall be returned immediately to stores with a note stating the cylinder number, nature of the fault and whether the cylinder is charged. Under no circumstances shall the user of the cylinder attempt any repair.
    • NOTE: All cylinder valve spindles have right handed threads.
    • Only standard valve keys shall be used and cylinder valves shall always be opened slowly by gently tapping the key. Cylinder valves shall always be closed when the cylinders are empty or not in use. Keys with long leverage should never be employed to force a valve to close. If the valve leaks when closed it is usually due to grit and this can often be removed by opening the valve slowly and closing it sharply.
    • All cylinders shall have a valve protection device, either a welded-on cage or a screw on cap. Valve protection devices shall be utilized when cylinders are not in use.
    • NOTE: The above does not apply to air cylinders for BA sets.
    • Only standard automatic pressure regulators and pressure gauges shall be fitted to oxygen and acetylene cylinders when in use. Flash back arresters shall be used at both ends of the hose, i.e., immediately after the regulator and immediately before the torch. The adjustable screw on the regulator shall always be released before the cylinder is opened. The cylinder valve shall be closed before the regulator is removed.
    • Compressed gas regulators must be used when connecting compressed gas cylinders to equipment.
    • Safety glasses or goggles must be worn when opening the compressed gas cylinder or LPG valve.
    • Employees must not stand in front of the opening of the compressed gas cylinder valve/regulator assembly while opening the cylinder valve.
    • Compressed gas cylinder valve must be opened slowly.
    • Compressed gas regulators and hoses should be de-pressurized when not in use.
    • Oil, grease, or other combustible substance must not come in contact with compressed gas cylinders and valves containing oxygen, especially valve and regulator threads.
    • Rubber hoses and other connections should be regularly inspected and damaged hoses replaced. Red hoses shall be used for acetylene and other combustible gases and blue hoses shall be used for other gases.
    • Leak testing should be carried out using soapy water or proprietary leak testing fluid. Leaking equipment shall never be used. Frozen equipment should be thawed out using hot water. Never use a flame to thaw equipment.
    • Compressed gas cylinders (especially acetylene) and LPG tanks must not be exposed to sparks and flames from welding or cutting torches.

    No cylinder shall be used if there is any doubt as to its contents. In case of doubt:

    • the valve should be taped
    • the cylinder should be clearly marked ‘DO NOT USE’
    • the cylinder should be returned to the supplier
    • Cylinders, valves, regulators and hoses should be inspected before starting a job and only equipment in serviceable condition shall be used.
    • Discontinue use of cylinders prior to being completely empty to leave a minimal amount of positive pressure in the cylinder.
    • Compressed gas cylinders must not contact electrical circuits.

    Storage and Handling

    Cylinders must be stored in a dedicated area, with signage and segregation of full and empty cylinders. The following rules shall apply to storage of cylinders:

    • Cylinders shall be stored with due regard to the fire hazard. No flammable materials shall be stored in the building with them or in the immediate vicinity on site.
    • Smoking is prohibited in compressed gas cylinder storage and use areas.
    • The cylinders shall be stored in such a manner that they can be readily removed in the event of a fire.
    • Oxygen cylinders and their fittings, including hoses, must be stored separately from combustible/flammable material by at least 20 feet, or by a noncombustible wall. Oils and greases are spontaneously combustible in the presence of oxygen.
    • Compressed gas cylinders must be protected from heat sources in excess of 125°F (51.5°C) and heating equipment must not be installed in store rooms where compressed gas cylinders are kept. Outside storage is acceptable if cylinders are protected from direct sunlight, heat, and standing water/corrosion.
    • If oxygen and acetylene cylinders have to be stored in the same area they shall be kept well apart. Preferably they should be stored in separate areas or a minimum of 6 meters apart.
    • Compressed gas cylinders must be secured in an upright position while in storage to prevent over-pressurization.

    The following rules shall apply to handling and movement of cylinders:

    • Cylinders should be moved by handcart, hand truck, or cylinder cart designed for moving compressed gas cylinders, when possible.
    • Cylinders of oxygen, propane and dissolved acetylene shall not be subjected to rough handling or excessive shock. Dragging, sliding, or horizontal rolling or compressed gas cylinders should be avoided. Cylinders weighing greater than 50 pounds (23 kg) should be moved by mechanical means or by utilizing additional persons to assist.
    • Cylinders shall never be dropped from a height or permitted to strike each other. A proper carriage or cage, NOT a sling, should be used for moving cylinders whether empty or full. Cylinders should be lifted using a wire rope sling and not a chain sling to avoid the possibility of sparking.
    • Cylinder valve protection caps shall be fitted to all compressed gas cylinders and left in place while in storage.
    • Cylinders shall not be transported with regulators and hoses attached unless a proper trolley is used.
    • Cylinders shall be transported in an upright vertical position.

    Color Coding of Cylinders

    • Gas cylinders are normally color coded for identification. It is important to be able to identify cylinders readily. The following table shows typical cylinder colors and characteristic for some gases likely to be used.
    • Identification of cylinders should be verified by the decal or label on the cylinder. Color coding should not be relied upon as the sole identification method as all suppliers do not consistently use the same color coding. Cylinders must not be used if there is any doubt regarding the contents.
    • Integrity Testing and Recommended Standards (ISO color code)
    • Handling and Use of Compressed Air
    • Extreme caution shall be taken when using compressed air. An air hose shall never be aimed at any person. Compressed air can be extremely dangerous when misused. Air under pressure may pass right through clothing and cause severe or fatal internal injury.
    • Compressed air shall not be used for blowing dust / chips from hair, clothing or workbench.
    • [See: Hand Tools (Pneumatic Powered Tools and Equipment)]

    References

    • CFR 1910.101
    ×
  • Confined Space Training

    Confined Space Training

    What is Confiend Space?

    JOS: Confined space is defined as any location having restricted accesss or egress and which is, or may become hazardous to worker. This includes trenching, elevated worksite, etc

    OSHA: Confined space is large enough space and so confined that an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned work but has limited or restricted means for entry or exit; and it is not designed for continuous employee occupancy

    Examples of Confined Space:

    • Bejana/Vessel
    • Bins
    • Boilers
    • Ducts
    • Manholes Pits
    • Pipes
    • Sewers
    • Tangki
    • Trenches
    • Tungku/Furnaces tanks
    • Tunnels
    • Vaults

    Confined Space Entry Procedures

    • Step 1 – Confined Space Identification
    • Step 2 – Equipment Identification
    • Step 3 – Isolation
    • Step 4 – Cleaning, Purging and Ventilasi
    • Step 5 – PPE
    • Step 6 – Qualification and Responsibilities
    • Step 7– Atmospheric Testing
    • Step 8 – Permit to work
    • Step 9 – Job Performing
    • Step 10 – Post Check
    • Step 11 – Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment
    Step 1 – Confined Space Identification

    If a space meets one of the following criteria then it classified as confined space:

    • Hazard: Does the space is closed enough and contain hazardous gas / atmosphere or other physical hazards?
    • Function: does the space not design for continuous employee occupancy
    • Entry & Exit: Does it has limited entry and exit so that rescue in emergency will require additional personnel and equipment?
    Confiend Space Classification:
    • Class 1: Confined space which presently and previously doesn’t contain hazardous atmosphere/gas
    • Class 2: Confined space which has a possibility of hazardous atmosphere/gas but can be eliminated/controlled
    • Class 3: Confined space which previously contained hazardous atmosphere/gas , or now it may be has a possibility of hazardous atmosphere and those hazards cannot be eliminated/controlled
    Step 2 – Equipment Identification

    Confined space data review includes, but not limited to:

    • Equipment number and location
    • Inside diagram of the space (mind-mapping)
    • Isolation/lockout-tag out list.
    • MSDS of the substance inside the “space”
    Step 3 – Isolation

    Isolate all energy to equipment:

    • Isolate piping system
    • Isolate electrical system
    • Isolate with proper Lockout/tagout equipment

    Area Supervisor must ensure all hazardous substances (toxic/flammable) has been eliminate to a safe level. Three methods normally used for process isolation:

    • Single valve lock
    • Blind or blank flange
    • Double block and bleed
    Step 4 – Cleaning, Purging and Ventilasi
    Puring

    Purging is replacing of hazardous/vapor with pure gas (Nitrogen (N2)/CO2) or steam by injecting it into the vessel Purging may create hazards since pure gas also removed oxygen from vessel, so oxygen is downed below its permissible concentration (19,5%), So ventilating must be conducted to allow safe fresh air enter space and create breathable atmosphere in confined space.

    Ventilating After Purging

    After a vessel has been purged, continuous ventilating is needed to removed pure gas and, or steam and maintain oxygen level (19,5 – 23%). There are two types of Ventilation :

    • Natural Ventilation: Using natural air flow to removed contaminant from confined space
    • Mechanical Ventilation: Air flow is generated by mechanical device / fan to removed air contaminant from confined space

    Natural ventilation can produce adequate air flow in certain circumstances. Due to equipment design and surrounding environment, also temperature and wind direction changes, it’s difficult to maintain adequate and continues air flow into confined space. This type of ventilation is not recommended, except in a certain circumstances

    Mechanical Ventilation

    Mechanical Ventilation is divided into 2 categories:

    • Local Ventilation: Exhaust ventilation that gives a means to removed contaminants by exhausted it at it source
    • General ventilation: General ventilation mean to supply outside air which’s clean generated to all parts of room continuously

    There are two systems on General ventilation:

    • Blower system – blowing outside to inside using fan
    • Exhaust system – Exhaust inside air to outside

    All type of mechanical ventilation is suitable for all confined space job. But selection of equipment type depends on:

    • Characteristic of contaminant
    • Confined space configuration
    • Type of job will be perform inside confined space
    Some Mistake on Air Ventilator

    Air Ventilator is Too Small / Air ventilator capacity doesn’t suit with work area – If air ventilator is too small, then air flow will not adequate to maintain safe atmosphere to workers. Size of air ventilator depends on the size of work area and the amount of air flow required for the job. Time at air replacement – Time for air replacement and volume must be define by a competent person such as engineer, because each confined space and activity requires different air flow

    Confined space configuration

    Because every confined space is unique, design and obstacle may cause improper ventilation.

    • A diagram of internal configuration will assist an identification of ventilation problem and gives a correction prior entering confined space.
    • Air ventilator may equip with a flexible ductwork to direct air flow. Some air ventilator can be used at the same time or a baffle system may applied to direct the air
    Step 5 – PPE

    ...

    Step 6 – Qualification and Responsibility

    During confined space work are taken places, safety watch must:

    • Maintain communication with personnel working inside confined space
    • Notify personnel working inside confined space should there any changes or unusual condition
    • Monitor life support system used in confined space job
    • DO NO other activity which can reduce his attention to personnel inside confined space
    • Record any personnel and material entering and leaving confined space
    • Stay at his point until the other competent replace him
    • Have authority to abandon the confined space job if required
    • Only qualified, well trained and experienced safety standby can do this job !!
    • Rescue personnel must have been trained such as safety stand by and also well trained in Industrial Rescue Training
    • Minimum 2 rescue personnel are familiar with CPR (Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation) and first aid standard
    • Only rescuer with mentally and physically fit are allowed working in confined space and doing rescue operation
    • Rescuer must familiar with lay out and diagram of the confined space
    • Only qualified, well trained and experience rescuer can do this job
    Remember:
    • Fire watch must have been trained such as safety standby and also well trained in fire fighting
    • Fire watch also must be familiar with confined space operation and lay out.
    • Only qualified, well trained and experienced Fire watcher can do this job
    Step 7– Atmospheric Testing
    • Gas test must be taken place at initial time and periodically to ensure safe atmosphere
    • Job cannot be performed should it detect a potential of gas release which may lead to fire or explosion and toxicities
    • Safety precaution must be taken for tank/vessel cleaning or fuel filter replacing, due to residue of pyrophoric oxides/ iron sulphides which has auto ignite ability if exposed against oxygen
    • All working area must be comprehensively tested prior to start a job in hazardous potential atmosphere

    Normal atmosphere density defines as 1 other gas refer to this number, if heavier/lighter than air the value will be above or below 1. The following chart indicate the density of other gas whether heavier or lighter than air

    Step 8 – Permit to work
    • Permit to work only valid for a time period stated on the permit
    • Permit must be prepared by an authorized personnel (normally supervisor or his designate person)
    • Permit must be post it clearly in the entrance of confined space
    • All issued permit must be recorded
    • Permit must be returned as completion of the job, or has been expired or because of something the permit should be returned (emergency).
    • Permit must be kept for a period of time. For JOS permit must be retained for at least one year
    Step 9 – Job Performing
    • Pre use inspection must be conducted for PPE, gas tester, emergency apparatus etc.
    • Conducting pre-job safety meeting to discuss work procedure, potential hazards, emergency plan, etc.
    • Proper placement of working equipment, or emergency apparatus use confined space checklist.
    • Check isolation that has been installed, use isolation checklist.
    • Perform work in compliance with JSA / SOP

    Ensure during work performing every procedure is followed and every personnel on his role and wear PPE as per PRAC recommendation

    Step 10 – Post Check

    Final inspection required to ensure that everything has been returned to its normal condition, check the following:

    • Check that there’s no equipment/tools left behind
    • Make sure all personnel have left the confined space.
    • All isolation has been opened and on the right position.
    • All permit has been returned to PTW control point and closed
    Rescue Procedure in Confined Space, Rescue Planning Must be discussed and ensure all personnel understand the following:
    • Equipment.
    • Personnel’s role.
    • Agreed command.
    • Safe area.
    ×
  • Cranes & Forklifts

    Cranes and Forklifts

    Application

    • All JOS field locations where there is a requirement to use cranes, forklift and trucks.

    Procedures

    • All cranes shall have a valid test certificate.
    • All crane operators shall have valid license.
    • All cranes are subjected for annual inspection by the Independent Third Party.
    • All forklifts shall have a valid test certificate which is valid for 12 months period.
    • All forklift operators shall have a valid license.
    • JOS shall permit only fully certified operators to operate mobile equipment, forklifts and cranes at JOS location.
    • Cranes shall be inspected daily by a competent person. Daily inspection record sheets which are signed by the competent person and crane operator shall be maintained and available for COMPANY review.
    • Crane maintenance shall be carried out and recorded based on the crane manufacturer's preventive maintenance program.
    • All crane hooks shall have a safety latch fitted to prevent accidental displacement of load and shall be inspected daily for deformation or cracks. Hooks with cracks or having 15% more than normal thread opening or more than 10% twist from the plane of the unbent hook shall be discarded.
    • JOS shall permit only fully certified operators to operate mobile equipment, forklifts and cranes at JOS location.
    • Cranes shall be inspected daily by a competent person. Daily inspection record sheets which are signed by the competent person and crane operator shall be maintained and available for COMPANY review.
    • Crane maintenance shall be carried out and recorded based on the crane manufacturer's preventive maintenance program.
    • All crane hooks shall have a safety latch fitted to prevent accidental displacement of load and shall be inspected daily for deformation or cracks. Hooks with cracks or having 15% more than normal thread opening or more than 10% twist from the plane of the unbent hook shall be discarded.
    • A dry chemical fire extinguisher of at least 10 kilograms shall be affixed to every crane.
    • All cranes shall be fitted with an automatic, anti-two blocking device or be fitted with an indicator, such as a flag tied to the load line above block, readily visible to the operator to warn of imminent two blocking.
    • All control levers, pedals and switches shall be fitted with locking devices to prevent accidental movement.
    • All cranes shall have momentary type controls which return to their neutral position when released
    • All cranes shall be equipped with limit switches which prevent the boom from travelling past its top and bottom stops and maximum load limiting equipped with a signal, which will actuate until corrective action is taken.
    • All control levers, pedals, and switches shall have a schematic affixed nearby stating their purpose and mode of operation.
    • A load chart shall be fitted, visible to the operator, showing the radii and safe working load of the main and auxiliary hook blocks. The correct rigging diagram shall be within easy view of the operator.
    • Crane booms should be left in a stable condition at the end of each workday or anytime the crane is left attended.
    • Cranes walking with suspended loads should have a flagman and the load restrained from swinging by use of a tag line or by attaching restraining lines back to the crane body.
    • Suspended loads which are totally or primarily supported by the crane shall not be left unsecured or unattended at any time.
    • There shall be an effective system of communication between the person supervising cargo handling and the crane operator.
    • Standard hand signals shall be posted or a clearly visible rigging director.
    • Potential hazards.
    • Contractor crane /forklift certification.

    Remember

    • All cranes and forklifts must be fitted with an audible reversing alarm.

    References

    • See: Chemical-Handling / Usage / Labeling
    • See: Hazardous Area’s Div. I. II. III]
    ×
  • Document Control

    Document Control

    Purpose

    • This Procedure Describes the Process for Control of Existing & New Documents.

    Responsibilities

    • Document Controller is Responsible for The Implementation and Maintenance of the Documentation System Defined in This Procedure.

    Procedures

    • JOS Company Procedures: New procedures should be developed as needed to address safety, health, and environmental risks which apply to all JOS operations.
    • Procedures should be developed /reviewed by a team of engineering operations, Health & Safety Staff, and led by the Loss Prevention & Environmental production Department Manager.
    • Site Specific Procedures: Site Specific procedures should be developed as needed.
    • Procedures must be at least as stringent as any applicable JOS Company procedure, if applicable.
    • Procedures should be developed for site specific risks not addressed by a JOS Company procedure.

    Quality Assurance

    • All documents must be checked for acceptance of standard format (format, index, numbering system).

    Review: The guidance for reviewing Documents

    • Policy annually
    • Standards and Procedures: every 2 years

    Storing and Recording

    • A designated document controller will be assigned to maintain and store current procedures. Site specific document controllers may be required to manage site specific procedures.

    Distribution

    • New and revised LP & EP procedures must be distributed to all sites. All employees and contractors must be made aware of procedures and requirements which will affect their work at JOS locations.

    Standard Format

    Purpose
    • This section details the object or intention of the Standard/Procedure. In the case of a revision to an existing Standard/Procedure, this section should specify additional objectives to be controlled or detail the changes to existing ones.
    Application
    • This section shall outline the activity and department, division or personnel to which the document is applicable and the extent of activities that are to be controlled.
    Definitions
    • This section shall provide common definitions of words, abbreviations or actions not readily understood. Definitions will be listed in alphabetical order.
    References
    • This section shall list and fully describe all other documents referred to by the procedure. These may include other procedures or appropriate Codes and Standards. Each reference shall be numbered and identified within the text of the procedure

    Responsibilities

    • This section shall provide who are accountable and/or responsible on the compliance, implementation, and maintenance of the Standard/Procedure.
    • Flowchart and Procedure
    • Whenever possible Standard/Procedures should be center around a flowchart of activities and written information used to support and explains the flowchart.
    • The text should be sufficiently detailed to provide a precise description of an activity or action.
    • The wording should be concise and tailored to the skill level of the individuals responsible for the activities controlled by the procedure.
    • Flowcharts shall be presented in a manner that reflects the order that the activities are to be performed.
    • All documents/reporting requirement, including those required for statutory purposes, are to be specified at the appropriate point in the flowchart procedure.
    ×
  • Emergency Response Plan

    Emergency Response Plan

    Purpose

    • This is to ensure that all JOS personnel are familiar with emergency response plans and follow the emergency response procedures. All employees may be requested to act in various capacities during critical aspects of an emergency.

    Procedures

    • Company Emergency Response Plan
    • Must be available at all Offices. It contains essential information required by the applicable department personnel to deal with emergencies.
    • Local Emergency Response Plan
    • Must be developed for locations and facilities according to the applicable corporate standard. Manuals must be available at the appropriate facility or office.
    • Location specific Contingency Plans
    • Location specific emergency response plans shall as a minimum include:
    • Clear definition for people on or at the production location, their roles and responsibilities in the event of an emergency.
    • Clearly defined emergency situation and the roles and responsibilities of those assigned to them.
    • General arrangement drawing/plans showing the layout of all emergency equipment for the production facility in question.
    • Clear and unambiguous information as to how the facility shall be evacuated in the event of an uncontrolled situation.
    • Clear description of events that might be classed as emergencies, they shall include but be not limited to the following:
    • Situation specific contingency plan(s) must be prepared in all cases where e.g. sour gas will be encountered and may be required under other circumstances as deemed necessary.

    Oil Spill Containment & Recovery (OSCAR)

    • Equipment is available at various locations. Emergency Response Team should have knowledge of its locations and how to activate its use.

    Emergency Evacuation

    • Must be included as part of a local or site-specific Emergency Response Plan.
    • E-R-T (Emergency response team)

    Responsibilities

    • In the event of an emergency, the JOS employee In-charge will be the on-scene Commander until more senior personnel are on-site and are able to take over responsibility.
    • Each department is responsible for ensuring that contact list revisions are communicated to HSE Department, who will then issue the revised contact list.
    • Local Emergency Response Plan training shall be employed at all fields locations, which should have realistic exercises/drills every 2 weeks, and the Incident Management, Team (IMT) should have full a scale Emergency Exercise annually, and special training must be maintained current by the Local Management.

    Training

    • Local Emergency Response Plan training shall be employed at regular intervals as appear necessary, to ensure that all company personnel know how to use the plan and respond to an emergency. Employees shall be trained in essential functions. Special training must be given to designated persons responsible for special functions. All training shall be documented.
    • Rehearsal and review should be done every second year or when significant changes occur in the overall operation and plan.
    • All facility/location managers and their respective emergency response teams shall undergo specific training and assessment in the management of major emergencies (MOME).

    References

    • OSHA 3122 – 06R (2004)
    ×
  • Excavation

    Excavation

    Potential Hazards

    • Death by Asphyxiation
    • Serious crush injuries
    • Mechanical equipment
    • Drawing
    • Toxic or flammable atmosphere
    • Electric shock
    • Pipeline damage
    • Slips, trips & falls.
    • Fire
    • Drowning

    Procedures

    • Approvals and Permits:
      • All permits and approvals must be obtained.
      • Underground facilities must be located and identified.

    Pre-Job Safety Meeting

    • Prior to performing any work, a pre-job meeting must be conducted, Site-specific procedure must be prepared where the excavation is complex.

    Identification

    • Ensure that all underground facilities are properly identified and located.
    • A written record must be kept of this identification.
    • A JOS representative must inspect and document the location and marking.
    • Open excavation shall be barricaded for identification and to protect people from falling.

    Location of Underground Pipelines and Utilities

    • No mechanical excavation shall be undertaken on a Pipeline ROW or within 5 meters of a pipe, cable or conduit before hand tools.
    • After hand exposure, the operation may progress only under the direct on-site supervision of an owner’s representative.
    • During mechanical excavation, where existing underground pipe, cable, conduit or facilities are involved, an observer is required at all times.
    • The observer and/or operator must be provided with a copy of drawings, permits and agreements, locating all existing underground installations.
    • If excavation do in suspected in atmospheric hazardous area, the atmospheres shall be tested before employees enter excavation
    • Greater than 1.5 feet in depth.
    • Daily inspections of excavations, the adjacent areas, and protective systems shall be made by JOS Representative for evidence of a situation that could result in possible cave-ins or other hazardous conditions.

    Protective Measures

    Before a worker begins working in an excavation greater than 1.5 meters in depth and narrower than its depth, the employer must ensure that the worker is protected from cave-ins and sliding material by the following:

    • Cutting back the walls to reduce the remaining vertical height to less than 1.5 meters, or Installing temporary protective structures (water removal equipment/drainage system and wall supports).
    • Where cutback method is used, the walls must be cut back, in hard and compact soils, to not less than 30 degrees from the vertical. In all other soils, 45 degrees from the vertical will be the minimum.
    • In shored excavations of over 3 meters, the shoring (design) must be approved by a professional engineer.
    • Spoil piles must be at least 1 meter from the side of the excavation and have a slope of less than 45 degrees.
    • Access ladder should be provided for worker entry and egress for excavation greater than 1.2 meters. Safe access/egress by means of stairways, ladders, etc. shall be provided for every 8 meter travel distance
    • If the excavation is to be left unattended, it must be barricaded at distance greater than 1 meter from the side of excavation complete with warning signs

    Precautions

    • No employee shall be permitted underneath loads handled by lifting or digging equipment.
    • Employees shall not work in excavations in which there is accumulated water unless special support is installed to protect cave-ins and control water level.
    ×
  • Hand & Power Tools

    Hand and Power Tools

    Potential Hazards

    • Injury from substandard hand tools
    • Electrical shock
    • Improper routing of cables
    • Uncontrolled pressure
    • Improper use
    • Source ignition
    • Noise
    • Fire

    Procedures

    • Only tools suited to the job shall be used, improvised tools must not be used.
    • Damaged or worn tools should be repaired or replaced.
    • The Designated Supervisor shall be responsible for implementing a 3 monthly inspection of hand tools

    Example

    • Non-Sparking tools should be used in flammable environments.

    Electric Powered Tools

    • Have a fail safe device such that they stop automatically when the operator releases hold
    • Tools shall only be used by trained, authorized personnel
    • A chuck key of the correct type only shall be used to operate chucks.

    Pneumatic Powered Tools

    • Pressure regulators shall be used where necessary to ensure that the manufacturer’s pressure rating for each tool is never exceeded.
    • Only sound, strong hoses with secure couplings and connections shall be used.
    • Where sparking or heat generated by use of a tool could represent a hazard, a coolant should be used to disperse heat and reduce the possibility of sparks.
    • All users of compressed air lines shall fit ‘whip checks’ and safety pins to crows foot connectors on airlines.
    ×
  • Hot Work

    Hot Work

    Purpose

    • To provide clear guidance of what constitutes hot work and allow effective control of such procedures within the permit to work system.
    • Any exception to this policy requires management approval.

    Application

    • All JOS locations

    Potential Hazards

    • Fire/explosion
    • Personnel Injuries
    • Combustible / toxic fumes

    Definition

    A hot work permit is required when the work can generate sufficient energy to produce a potential source of ignition. This may vary from, but not limited to grinding, arc, spark, open flame, and use of non-intrinsically safe equipment.

    Examples

    • Welding
    • Shrink Sleeve Blower
    • Oxy/acetylene Torches
    • Soldering Equipment
    • Open flame
    • Hilt Gun
    • Electric Power Tools
    • Opening explosion proof or purged enclosures in a classified area.
    • Abrasive Wheels
    • Grinding Tools
    • Hot tapping
    • Sand/grit blasting
    • Controlled burning
    • Flare pits

    Recommended Procedures

    • Where practical, all combustibles will be relocated a minimum of 10m horizontally from the work site. Where relocation is impractical, combustibles will be protected with fireproof covers or shielded by metal walls or fiberglass blankets. Openings or cracks in walls, floors, drains or ducts within 10m of the site will be tightly covered in order to prevent the passage of sparks to adjacent areas
    • Prior to hot work commencing, the JOS Senior Supervisor shall ensure:
    • A Hot Work Permit is obtained, according to the JOS Permit to Work Program.
    • Drains are plugged to prevent back flow of vapors.
    • The draining, venting or purging of equipment and lines is completed.
    • A gas test for combustible vapors has been made. (Applicable on hydrocarbon producing and/or processing platforms and in the vicinity of stored chemicals or hydrocarbon products). A 0% reading for LEL is required for Hot Work.
    • The wind direction will not cause any flammable vapor from distant vent, to migrate to the hot work area.
    • The other side of the plate or tank plate or vessel is clean and free of flammable material.
    • Vessels or other enclosures are clean and free of flammable material.
    • A fire watch and extinguishing equipment are present and operable. For fire watch guidelines during welding or cutting torch operations refer to paragraph 8 (Fire Watch Guidelines) During hot work other than welding or cutting torch operations, a member of the work team may act as fire watch while work in which he is not performing a task takes place.
    • Under no circumstances will compressed oxygen be used for ventilation or to blow through an acetylene hose. Explosions can occur when acetylene gas is present in air in any proportion between 2.2% and 80% by volume.
    • When working at a height, precautions shall be taken to prevent welding rods, stubs and slag from falling.
    • On hydrocarbon producing locations, or in the vicinity of stored chemicals or hydrocarbon products, gas testing for combustible vapors shall be made periodically while hot work is in progress, or continuously if necessary.
    • Pipelines which cross the location must be protected from the hot work and checked for leaks. They must not be subject to weld splatter and sparks or used as the ground for welding return currents.
    • All hot work shall be performed as far removed from wellheads and production equipment as possible.
    • JOS supervisor (Production Supervisor, Assistant Supervisor, Construction Representative or Drilling Supervisor) familiar with the operating process shall be on site until the hot work operation is completed and shall ensure the compliance with all requirements on the Hot Work Permit is complied with.
    • All personnel involved in hot work activities must be alert to the dangers of fire and explosion. No work is permitted in the presence of flammable atmospheres, or where flammable atmospheres may develop due to unclean or improperly prepared drums, tanks or other containers, equipment which may have previously contained flammable materials, or in areas which may develop an accumulation of combustible dusts.
    • Special precautions should be taken when cleaning out tanks and vessels or changing fuel gas filters, as the residue encountered may contain pyrophoric substances. These substances, consisting mainly of oxides or iron sulfides, may ignite spontaneously if allowed to dry out. Special precautions must be taken for their safe disposal.

    Welding and Cutting Guidelines

    • Welders' and helpers' personal protective equipment is to comply with ANSI/ACS Z49.1 specifications or equivalent and the Personal Protective Equipment Policy and Procedure.
    • Prior to welding, cutting, burning or brazing on tanks, vessels or equipment, the JOS Senior Discipline Supervisor shall ensure they are free from flammable gases and vapors, oil or sludge. When vessels and tanks are being welded or burned on the outside, there is a danger of toxic or flammable gases collecting within the vessel or tank. Particular care is to be taken to ensure adequate ventilation and/or respirator protection. This is especially relevant in confined spaces. Refer to separate Confined Space Entry Policies and Procedures for more detail.
    • Safety meetings shall be held prior to commencing welding or cutting and at break points such as shift changes, etc.
    • Where hardened deposits are present in the vicinity of an area to be welded or cut, and it is not intended to remove these deposits, welding or cutting shall not start until the makeup of the deposits is determined
    • Toxic gases and fumes produced by welding can create serious hazards; therefore, proper ventilation should always be assured and required respiratory equipment utilized. Examples of toxic gas and fumes produced by welding are as follows:
      • Nitrous fumes may be produced if an oxyacetylene flame is permitted to impinge on a large section of metal for long periods during gas welding.
      • Gas welding may produce carbon monoxide.
    • Arc welding of iron or steel produces fumes consisting of very fine particles of iron oxide.
    • Welding brass, bronze and manganese generates large quantities of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide.
    • Lead based paints emit lead fumes when welded or cut.
    • The welding or cutting of coated materials shall only be carried out when adequate means of removing the fumes are available, or adequate respiratory equipment is utilized. The application of any oxyacetylene flame to metal coated with metallic lead, zinc or other substances may emit highly toxic vapors. This is particularly true where an excess of oxygen is required.
    • Caution: Welding and X-ray will set off ultra violet fire detectors and smoke detectors. These fire detection systems should be isolated during hot work.

    Fire Watch Guidelines

    • An individual assigned to fire watch shall visually monitor all welding or cutting torch operations. A minimum of one fire watch, whose sole duty is that of fire watch, is required on each location. When cutting through a bulkhead, roof or steel decking a fire watch shall be present on both sides.
    • The fire watch will:
      • Have fire-extinguishing equipment present and trained in its use, including practice on actual fires.
      • Be familiar with facilities, and procedure for sounding an alarm in the event of a fire.
      • Watch for fires in all exposed areas, particularly on the blind side of bulkheads and walls, and try to extinguish them when obviously within the capacity of the equipment available, or otherwise sound the alarm immediately.
    • Maintain a fire watch for 30 minutes after completion of cutting or welding operations in order to detect and extinguish possible smoldering fires, including an inspection of adjacent compartments that may have been affected.
    • Gas testing for combustible vapors shall be made continuously while welding or cutting torch operations are in progress.

    Welding Equipment Guidelines

    • All diesel-welding machines shall be fitted with spark arresting mufflers. Welding machines shall be shutdown anytime the job is left unattended and during refueling.
    • The welding return current clamp shall be set at the work site or within 3m of the work site when practical. The return current clamp shall always be visible to the fire watch.
    • Welders shall never coil gas hoses or welding leads around their body when burning or welding.

    Oxygen/Acetylene Equipment Guidelines

    • Cylinders of oxygen, acetylene or propane are never to be taken into a confined space. Gas hoses and welding leads are not to be taken into a confined space until immediately prior to their use. Likewise, they shall be removed when not actively being used. Where this cannot be done, the oxygen and acetylene connections shall be disconnected at the cylinders situated outside of the confined space. Closing the valve is not a disconnection.
    • Oxygen and acetylene hoses shall be turned off at the cylinder valve anytime the equipment is not being actively used. A check valve shall be installed in both the oxygen and acetylene lines. A flashback arrester shall be installed adjacent to the acetylene regulator valve.
    • Oxygen and acetylene shall be stored separately in an upright position, protective caps on and secured in place. Preferably, the oxygen and acetylene shall be stored in separate well ventilated areas. A minimum of 6m or a non-combustible wall should separate the two types of cylinders. Cylinders in welding carts or mounted on vehicles need not be separated.
    • Cylinders shall be transported and used in a cradle made to hold the cylinders. The cylinders shall be in a vertical position in the cradle

    Electrical Hot Work

    • The opening of explosion proof or purged enclosures in classified areas that house powered-up arc producing devices, i.e. a source of ignition, is considered hot work.
    • Precautions must be taken when such boxes or enclosures are opened including continuous gas monitoring throughout the period that the box is open and the provision of a designated fire watch.
    • Opening explosion proof boxes that are located within purged control rooms or at any location when the power is off and isolated does not constitute hot work.

    References

    • OSHA CFR 1910.106,252,253,254,255
    • API RP 54
    • API PUBLICATION 2201
    • NFPA 30
    • AESC, HOT WORK
    ×
  • Housekeeping

    Housekeeping

    Potential Hazards

    • Slipping
    • Tripping
    • Fire
    • Falls
    • Crushing
    • Caught Between (Pinned)

    Procedures

    • Poor housekeeping practices are responsible for many accidents in the work place. With a little effort, this problem is easily eliminated.
    • Good housekeeping practices include keeping tools, materials, equipment, buildings, and properties clean and in good order.
    • Good housekeeping is the day-to-day responsibility of all employees and is a continual process. Periodic cleanups, or cleanups when time permits, is not considered to be adequate.
    • Tools and materials shall not be scattered around the walking or working surfaces while the job is in progress.
    • Haphazardly scattered tools, equipment and materials are an invitation to an accident.
    • No job is complete until tools have been cleaned and properly stored, scrap and waste materials disposed of, and the equipment and work locations is in good orderly condition, and approved for continues operation.
    • Sharp and pointed tools shall be stored properly. Leaving such tools lying around loose creates an unnecessary hazard.
    • Slick spots on the walking surface caused by water, oil or other substances shall be cleaned up immediately. Allowing this condition to exist, even for a short period of time, is dangerous.
    • Waste rags, trash, etc., must not be permitted to accumulate, it should be properly disposed of as soon as possible.
    • Materials or equipment delivered to the job site shall be kept well away from the working area until needed.
    • Protruding nails, straps, or wire shall not be permitted to exist in the work place. They shall be removed immediately when found.
    • All material to be stacked shall be cross-tied or otherwise secured so that it will not fall over. Rolling stock such as pipe should be checked so it cannot roll onto an employee.
    • Aisle ways and walking surfaces shall always be kept clear of materials and equipment as much as possible.
    ×
  • Ladders

    Ladders

    Purpose

    • To provide direction for the design and installation of fixed ladders, stairs, and platforms.

    Application

    • All JOS plant and field locations.

    Potential Hazard

    • Slips/trips and falls
    • Electricity

    Procedure

    • The usage of fixed ladders, stairs, and platforms should comply with JOS Specifications
    ×
  • Lifting Gear

    Lifting Gear Certification

    Potential Hazards

    • Failure of lifting equipment under load causing serious injury and loss/damage to process or equipment.

    Lifting Equipment

    • Category I - Slings ,come- alongs
    • Category II - Miscellaneous Hardware
    • Category III - Special Appliances and Fixtures
    • Lifting gear table

    Category I - Slings

    • Wire rope slings (including those attached to cargo containers, etc).
    • Alloy Steel Chain slings
    • Metal Mesh Slings
    • Natural and Synthetic Fiber Rope Slings
    • Synthetic webbing slings
    • Cargo nets
    • Personnel baskets (include due to critical nature of equipment)
    • Passenger and service lifts
    • Chain blocks
    • Come-along

    Category II - Miscellaneous Hardware

    • Pulleys (pulley blocks, snatch blocks, sheavers)
    • Eye bolts
    • Hooks
    • Come - alongs
    • Plate clamps (including attached slings)
    • Air Tuggers
    • Cargo containers
    • Shackles
    • Barrel hooks
    • Other similar hardware
    • Win rope slings (including those attached to cargo containers, etc)
    • Chain slings
    • Nylon polyester belt slings. Note: from Cat. I

    Category III - Special Appliances and Fixtures

    • Cargo baskets
    • Hoist runway beams
    • Special - lifting tools, support, and stands
    • Spreader bars (frames)
    • Cylinder Racks
    • Barrel racks
    • Transportable tanks

    Repair or Alteration

    • Any item of lifting equipment of category III which has been repaired or altered in any way from its original configuration should be load tested and certified according to this procedure before it is used.
    • Contractor/sub contractor lifting equipment used on JOS offshore and onshore facilities shall comply with the intent of this standard. The contractor must use this standard or some other appropriate procedure that ensures compliance with this policy. This will be mutually agreed by JOS and the contractor (bridging document).
    • Policy compliance shall be communicated in pre-tender information. Proof of certification and ongoing re-certification will be produced upon demand.
    ×
  • Lifting Operation

    Lifting Operations

    Purpose

    To provide a Standard for safe lifting operations to provide safety of personnel, equipment, facility, and environment while lifting loads by crane, derrick, or other lifting equipment.

    Application

    This Standard applies to all lifting activities including loading/unloading cargo, other lift handling of persons within JOS locations.

    Potential Hazards

    Power line contact, overloading, un-determined load weight, outrigger failure (soft ground and structural), two-blocking, pinch point, unguarded moving parts, unsafe hooks, hook caught on, obstruction of vision, sheave-caused cable damage, cable kinking, side pull, boom buckling (from striking objects), access to cabs, bridges, and/or runways, control confusion (non-uniform location), turntable failure, removable or extendible counterweight systems.

    Operator Requirements

    • The Site Leader shall assign a designated person to operate, maintain, repair and inspect all hoisting machinery and rigging equipment prior to each use, and during use, to make sure it is in safe operating condition.
    • The crane operator, must meet all requirements for certification and demonstrate competency skill and acknowledge for operating the Crane.
    • Annual or when required Refractory Check shall be conducted for Crane Operator.
    • Riggers, signalers, and others who involve with lifting work by crane, shall have rigger qualification and certification.

    Crane Requirements

    Crane shall be equipped with the following:

    • Counterweight as specified by the manufacturer for mobile crane.
    • A serviceable, approved fire extinguisher, which is readily accessible to the operator.
    • A serviceable and adjustable seat.
    • Guards for personal protection over all exposed moving parts, which are considered hazardous under normal operating conditions.
    • Boom angle indicator
    • A device to determine that the crane is level for all mobile crane operations.
    • A 100-foot (30.5 meters), non-conducting tape measure.
    • An audible horn or bell-signaling device.
    • Safety Devices: anti two block, boom stopper, swing brake, parking break.
    • Manufacturer approved load chart mounted in the cab, which is correct for the counterweight, boom and jib supplied,
    • A logbook (running hours, maintenance)
    • A maintenance and inspection program for the crane and boom shall be established and followed.
    • The crane shall be supplied with wire ropes equivalent in size, grade, and construction to those recommended by the crane manufacturer
    • The weight and capacity of crane shall be permanently and legibly marked on the blocks, equalizer beam, dragline, clamshell, concrete buckets, and any other accessories that contribute to the load, handled by the crane.
    • Length and serial number are permanently and legibly marked on all boom and jib sections.
    • No lifting machinery, crane or derrick, nor rigging equipment having a visible or known defect that affects safe operation shall be used.
    • All exhaust pipes shall be guarded or insulated in areas where contact by employees is possible in the performance of normal duties.

    Operator's cabin

    The cabin, controls and mechanism of the equipment shall be so arranged that the operator have a clear view of the load or signalman, when one is used. Any deviation to the above condition, the following options shall be followed:

    • A single band radio shall be provided for communication between signalman and operator.
    • A series signalman system shall be in place. Only one dedicated signalman who is visible to the Crane Operator.
    • Cabin glass shall be safety plate glass or equivalent. Cranes with missing, broken, cracked, scratched, or dirty glass (or equivalent) shall be rectified immediately. Cabin glass that impairs operator visibility shall not be used.
    • Clothing, tools and equipment shall be stored so as not to interfere with access, operation, and the operator's view.

    Operating Controls

    • All control mechanisms such as: operating controls, braking, locking and maneuvers (radius indicator) shall be operable, properly maintained and in safe condition. Those operating controls shall be clearly marked, or a chart indicating their function shall be posted at the operator's position.
    • Wind-indicating devices shall be available. In case of offshore crane, wind-indicating devices could be located at radio room.
    • For cranes located on marine vessel, Pitching and rolling indicating devices shall be available.
    • allast or counterweight shall be located and secured only as provided in the manufacturer's specifications, which shall be available.

    Access, ladders, stairways, stanchions, grab irons, footsteps or equivalent means shall be provided as necessary to ensure safe access to foot-walks, cabin platforms, the cabin and any portion of the superstructure which employees must reach:

    • Foot walks shall be of rigid construction;
    • Fix Ladder shall be equipped with cage.
    • Stairways on cranes shall be equipped with rigid handrails.
    • If any position of employee on the ladder or stairway could be strike by crane's maneuver, a prominent warning sign shall be posted at the foot of the ladder or stairway. A system of communication (such as a buzzer or bell) shall be established and maintained between the foot of the ladder or stairway and the operator's cabin.
    • Wood blocks or other support shall be of sufficient size to support the outrigger, free of defects that may affect safety and of sufficient width and length to prevent the crane from shifting or toppling under load. Crane operator is responsible to ensure that outriggers are properly seated and the cabin position is leveled.
    • Engine exhaust gases shall be discharged away from the normal position of crane operating personnel. Engine exhaust shall be equipped with a spark arresting type silencer.
    • Electrical equipment shall be located or enclosed that live parts will not be exposed to accidental contact. Designated persons may work on energized equipment only if necessary during inspection, maintenance, or repair.
    • At least three full turns of rope shall remain on un-grooved drums, and two turns on grooved drums, under all operating conditions. Wire rope shall be secured to drums by wedges and clamps or equivalent means. Fiber rope fastenings are prohibited.
    • Mobile crane booms being assembled or disassembled on the ground with or without the support of the boom harness/cradle shall be blocked to prevent dropping of the boom or boom sections.

    Brakes

    • Each independent hoisting unit of a crane shall be equipped with at least one holding brake, applies directly to the motor shaft or gear train.
    • Each independent hoisting unit of a crane, except worm geared hoists, the angle of worm is to prevent the load from accelerating in the lowering direction, shall, in addition to a holding brake, be equipped with a controlled braking means to control lowering speeds.
    • Holding brakes for hoist units shall have not less than the required percentage of the rated load hoisting torque at the point where the brake is applied.
    • All power control braking means shall be capable of maintaining safe lowering speeds of rated loads.

    Derricks

    Derrick operations shall be directed only by the individual specifically designated for that purpose. Maximum load shall be 90% of rating of derrick SWL.

    • For permanently installed derrick, durable and clearly legible rating chart must be provided with each derrick and securely affix where it is Visible to personnel responsible for the safe operation of the equipment. Charts shall include manufacturer’s approve load rating, specific length of component on which the load ratings are based, required parts for hoist revving.
    • For non-permanent installation, the manufacturer must provide sufficient information from which capacity chart can be prepared for the particular installation. The capacity charts must be located at the derrick and the job site office.

    Crane Lifting Operations

    Critical Lifting

    No crane will be loaded beyond its rate capacity. A Critical Crane Lifting Plan and Permit To Work shall be made for the following conditions:

    • At any time during a lift, the load is 80% of the crane SWL will be exceeded.
    • Irregular shape e.g. concrete, plate, pipe, rods, etc.
    • Valuable material (see high risk level cost)
    • Hazardous material
    • Weather (maximum wind speed 25 knots)
    • Rolling and Pitching
    • Any time such as a lifting crossing the process plant, accommodation, etc.
    • For more than 80 ton mobile crane
    • When the crane operator has no experience to lift a specific load.
    • For complex lifting, JSA shall be thoroughly analyzed (e.g. tandem lifting)
    • Crawler crane travels with load.
    • At any time the Site Leader feels there is a requirement.
    Remember:
    • No lifting shall be conducted when wind speed >36 knots. Only emergency lifting (safety of life) can be proceed with multi discipline risk assessment and site leader approval.
    • Conduct pre-inspection prior to lifting at the beginning of the day for crane access ladders, walkways and hatches, pre-start checks, housekeeping of machine, structure, cabin, and personal belonging, prime movers, over-hoist limits/cut-outs, rated capacity indicators, emergency load release and gross overload protection system, emergency engine stops, safety equipment, fuel. An SOP for this inspection shall be provided.
    • The operator shall refer to Crane Operation checklist prior to starting the crane.
    • Hand signals to crane and derrick operators shall be those prescribed by the applicable ANSI standard for onshore use. An illustration of the signals shall be posted at the job site and visibly maintained.
    • The crane operator is must be aware of all those personnel designated as Rigger and Signalman.
    • Designated signalman shall be equipped with specific sign on his uniform for each lifting.
    • The crane operator, signalman, and rigger shall have the same band of radio communication.
    • Maintain visual contact with the signalman. Lifting operations must cease if visual contact is lost. These operations can only recommence when a clear line of vision is re-established.
    • Crane operator shall only respond to clear hand or radio signals given by the signalman. Unless in emergency situation, the crane operator may response to other person for emergency stop.
    • Load must be vertically lifted at any time.
    • All employees shall be kept clear of loads about to be lifted and of suspended loads.
    • Accessible areas within the swing radius of the rear of the rotating superstructure of the crane or any hoisting machinery shall be free and signed to prevent any personnel from being struck or crushed by the crane.
    • Put cargo and material in the designated place. Do not obstruct any access and egress.
    • Cargo handling operations shall not be carried on when noise-producing, maintenance, construction or repair work interferes with the communication of warnings or instructions.
    • Cargo of hazardous materials shall be handled and lifted in accordance with materials safety data sheet (MSDS) and/or packaging rules.
    Workplace and Housekeeping
    • All hazardous cargo shall be slung and secured so that neither the draft nor individual packages can fall as a result of tipping the draft or slacking of the supporting gear.
    • All chemical or oil drums shall be lifted in a certified steel half-height container (see picture), or tote tank, cargo net, which will not cause drums to fall.Pallets are purely used for allowing forklift truck to transport cargo along flat solid ground/deck, NOT FOR CRANE LIFT.
    • Pallets are purely used for allowing forklift truck to transport cargo along flat solid ground/deck, NOT FOR CRANE LIFT.
    • Pre-lift safety meeting shall be attended by the crane or derrick operator, signal person(s). This meeting shall be held prior to lifting at each new work location, and shall be repeated for any personnel involved and newly assigned to the operation.
    • The Site Leader or other authorized person shall post operating instructions for high wind conditions in the operator's cabin of each crane.
    • Night Lifting can be performed with sufficient illumination (300 fluxes).
    Attaching the load
    • Use the proper sling size and type
    • The sliding choke sling shall not be used. Double wrap type may be used with shackle to secure the load.
    • The load shall be attached to the hook in accordance with API rigging requirement.
    • The operator shall aware that the hook load is within the crane’s applicable static or dynamic rated load at the radius at which the load is to be lifted.
    Moving the load

    The load shall be well secured and properly balanced in the sling or lifting device before it is lifted more than a few inches.

    • Before starting to hoist, the following conditions shall be noted:
      • Hoist rope shall not be kinked.
      • Multiple part lines shall not be twisted around each other.
      • The hook shall be brought over the load in such a manner to prevent swinging.
    • During hoisting, care shall be taken that:
      • There is no sudden acceleration or deceleration of the moving load.
      • Load does not contact any obstructions.
    • A derrick shall not be used for side loading except approved by Site Leader
    • No hoisting, lowering, or swinging shall be done while anyone is on the load or hook.
    • The operator should avoid carrying loads over people.
    • Neither the load nor boom shall be lowered below the point where less than two full wraps of rope remain on their respective drums.
    • When rotating a derrick, sudden starts and stops shall be avoided. Rotational speed shall be such that the load does not swing out beyond the radius at which it can be controlled.
    • Boom and hoisting rope systems shall not be twisted.
    Holding the Load
    • The operator shall not be allowed to leave his position at the controls while the load is suspended; If the load must remain suspended for any considerable length of time, a dog, or pawl and ratchet, or other equivalent means, rather than the brake alone, shall be used to hold the load.
    Use of Winch Heads
    • Ropes shall not be handled on a winch head without the knowledge of the operator;
    • While a winch head is being used, the operator shall be within convenient reach of the power unit control lever;
    • Dogs, pawls, or other positive holding mechanism on the hoist shall be engaged. When not in use, the derrick boom shall:
      • Be laid down
      • Be secured to a stationary member, as nearly under the head as possible, by attachment of a sling to the load block; or
      • Be hoisted to a vertical position and secured to the mast.
    ×
  • Mechnical Equipment

    Mechanical Equipment and Guards

    Schedule

    • Purpose
    • Application
    • Potential Hazards
    • Procedures

    purpose

    • To provide safe work practices for protection of personnel from rotating equipment and heat sources.

    Application

    • All JOS plant/field activities and equipment.

    Potential Hazards

    • All rotating equipment, belts, pulleys, grinder, strophic effects (cause by rotating equipment specialist) etc., that present a hazard to personnel must be guarded. Any openings that could present a hazard to personnel must be guarded. All piping and equipment operated at a temperature that could cause personnel injury, must be insulated, clad, guarded or otherwise protected.

    Procedures

    • All mechanical equipment shall be installed and maintained only by qualified persons authorized to do so.
    • Equipment shall be maintained in a safe condition at all times and any such
    • Equipment found to be unsafe shall be isolated / immobilized until repaired.
    • Protective clothing and equipment shall be worn as appropriate when Operating or maintaining mechanical equipment.
    • All rotating, hot, cold and other moving parts shall be adequately guarded from accidental or other contact by personnel.
    • Mechanical equipment shall be immobilized / isolated before any guards are removed and shall be rendered inoperative against start up by means of electrical or mechanical isolation.
    • Any guards removed shall be refitted and adjusted before the Equipment is brought back into use. Whenever possible, adjustments shall only be made with the equipment immobilized or isolated
    • Safety devices, including guards, governors, over speed trips, and other emergency shutdown devices fitted to machines shall not be removed or overridden.
    • When work is carried out on moving machinery, a second person shall be in attendance at the control point to shut down in the event of emergency.
    • Rotating / moving parts such as spindles, chucks, belts and gears may trap loose articles and clothing, or draughts caused by fans or rapidly rotating mechanical components may ‘draw’ clothing.
    • Operators and supervisors shall ensure that no hazard results from loose clothing or long hair whilst operating machines.
    • Gloves shall not be worn.
    • Coveralls shall have cuffs that secure at the wrist.

    Lathes / Machine Tools

    • Only authorized and suitably trained persons shall operated machine tools Protective clothing, particularly eye protection, shall be worn as appropriate to the job and machinery in use.
    Machine safety guards shall be in position. In particular the following rules shall apply:
    • Never use rags or waste near moving machinery
    • Always use a chuck / cutter guard
    • Never leave chuck keys / vice handles in position when not being used
    • Mechanical stops or electrical cut-outs must not be removed or inhibited unless detailed on a work permit
    • The machine should never be operated from the isolating
    • Switch, only from its own on / off switch
    • Secure all loose items of clothing when operating machinery
    The following notices should be on all lathes, milling and drilling machines:
    • Authorized operators only wear eye protection.
    Work Procedure for Use of Workshop Machines
    • When machining work is carried out the chuck guard shall be.
    • Used at all times. If a work piece is too large, or any other factor prohibits the use of the chuck guard, an exception to the above rule may be made, but only after the following procedure has been adhered to.
    • The machining operation shall be discussed by the Maintenance Supervisor.
    • If the decision is made by the Maintenance Supervisor to proceed with the work, a work permit shall be raised giving a full description of the machining operation and safety precautions to be taken.
    • On receipt of the work permit and full compliance with the safety instructions detailed on that permit, the work may proceed.
    Abrasive Wheels and Grinding
    • No person shall mount, dress or use an abrasive wheel unless trained and authorized to do so. A register of authorized personnel shall be maintained by the Maintenance Supervisor. Eye protection shall be worn for all operations including fitting and dressing of abrasive wheels. Eye protection plus a face shield must be worn when using abrasives wheels.
    • Storage and handling of wheels:
      • Wheels shall be handled and stored with care in accordance with the manufacturer’s instruction knocking, dropping or sudden impact should be avoided wheels have a limited shelf life and should be stored in cool dry conditions in a position suited to the shape / size of the wheel.
    • Fitting and dressing of wheels:
      • The wheel shall comply with the maximum wheel size and speed marked on the machine
      • Before fitting, a wheel shall be inspected to ensure it is sound after fitting, the wheel shall be run in and a balance check carried out before any grinding is attempted.
      • Wheels shall only be dressed using the correct tool and procedure.

    Use of Grinder

    • Grinding wheels shall be fitted with adequate guards which are correctly adjusted
    • The work rest shall be secure and adjusted to the minimum practical clearance and not more than 6mm between rest and wheel
    • The wheel shall never be used at speeds greater than those marked on the wheel
    • The grinder shall be marked to show maximum wheel size and speed
    • Care should be taken to avoid sudden impact or knocking of the wheel as one of the great hazards with abrasive wheels is the disintegration of the wheel in service
    • Care shall be taken at all times to ensure that no part of the body comes into contact with the wheel
    • Normal pressure only shall be applied to the wheel. No undue force or pressure shall be used
    • The side of a wheel shall not be used for grinding unless the wheel is designed for the purpose
    • Only the correct wheel for the job shall be used. Soft material for which the wheel is not intended will clog a wheel, cause imbalance, hinder heat dissipation and may cause the wheel to disintegrate
    • In the case of portable tools used for abrasive / grinding work, the additional requirements of section shall apply
    • Hand held grinders shall not be used to grind small hand held items
    ×
  • PPE

    Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

    Definition

    PPE is a head to toe protective equipment which designed to create a barrier against workplace hazard.

    Function

    To protect workers from working hazards, environment hazards, and reduce injury severity if accident occurred.

    PPE in the Past
    • People have used Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for centuries to protect themselves while they work.
    • Personal protective equipment today, as in the past, makes working safer and you more productive.
    • Regulations/Guidance for "Personal Protective Equipment" OSHA 29 CFR 1910.132-138
    • Briefly stated, this standard requires that employers must establish and administer an effective PPE program for employees and that employees be trained in proper use of PPE
    Types of Hazard

    Something with the potential to cause harm. They can include substances or machines, methods of work and other aspects of work organization

    • Physical Hazard
    • Chemical Hazard
    • Biological Hazard
    • Psychosocial Hazard
    Potential Hazards in the Workplace
    • Motion
    • High temperatures
    • Chemical exposures
    • Harmful dust or light radiation
    • Falling object or dropping objects
    • Sharp objects
    • Rolling or pinching objects
    • Layout of workplace and location of co-workers
    • Electrical hazards
    Hierarchy of Hazard Controls
    • Eliminate Hazard
    • Substitute Hazard
    • Engineering Controls
    • Work Practice Controls (Administrative)
    • PPE
    Eliminating Hazard
    • Improve design of equipment/processes
    • Better methods of guarding
    • Substituting safe or less hazardous substances for those presenting unacceptable levels of risk
    Engineering Controls If
    • The machine or work environment can be physically changed to prevent employee exposure to the potential hazard.
    • Examples:
      • Initial design specifications
      • Substitute less harmful material
      • Change process
      • Enclose process
      • Isolate process
      • Ventilation
    Work Practice Controls If
    • Employees can be removed from exposure to the potential hazard by changing the way they do their jobs.
    • Examples:
      • Use of wet methods to suppress dust
      • Personal hygiene
      • Housekeeping and maintenance
      • Job rotation of workers
      • Training
    Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
    • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is the last level control
    • PPE should be used only when other measures can’t offer the protection you need
    • PPE does not eliminate the hazards and only provides a barrier between the worker and the hazards
    Minimum PPE Required by JOS
    • Hard Hat
    • Safety glasses
    • Safety Shoes
    • Approved flame retardant coveralls
    Potential Hazards
    Eye & Face Protection
    • Dusts, Powders, Fumes and Mists Operations such as grinding, chiseling, sanding, hammering, and spraying can create small airborne particles, particles that can injure your eyes
    Flying Objects or Particles
    • Operations such as grinding, chiseling, sanding, and hammering often create flying objects or particles that can damage your eyes
    • Toxic Gases, Vapors, and Liquids
    • Toxic chemicals in the form of gases, vapors, and liquids can damage your eyes. Always read the appropriate MSDS before working with any hazardous material.
    Molten Metals
    • Operations which involve or produce molten metal, if splashed, splattered, or dripped into the eyes, cause severe burns and tissue damage
    Electrical Hazards
    • Any time you work around electricity, there is the potential for arcs and sparks to occur.
    Thermal and Radiation Hazards
    • Operations such as welding, metal cutting, and working around furnaces can expose your eyes to heat, glare, ultraviolet, and infrared radiation
    Lasers
    • Laser beams present a new hazard in some workplaces

    Personal Protection Equipment

    Safety Glasses

    Safety glasses are much stronger and more resistant to impact and heat than regular glasses. Most safety glasses are equipped with side shields that give you protection from hazards that may not be directly in front of you. Safety glasses should be Z-87 approved to meet OSHA regulations.

    Goggles

    Goggles give you more protection than safety glasses as they fit closer to your face. Goggles surround the eye area and give more protection in situations where might encounter splashing liquids, fumes, vapors, powders, dusts, and mists.

    Absorptive Lenses

    A wide variety of absorptive lenses are available for use in safety glasses and goggles that offer additional protection if you must work where there is bright light or glare.

    Face Shields

    Face shields offer full face protection and are often used around operations which expose to molten metal, chemical splashes, or flying particles.

    • NOTE: Always wear safety glasses or goggles when using a face shield. Face shields alone are NOT considered adequate eye protection.
    Welding Helmets

    Welding helmets provide both face and eye protection. Welding helmets use special absorptive lenses that filter the intense light and radiant energy.

    • NOTE: safety glasses or goggles should be worn when using a welding helmet.

    Respiratory Awareness Protection

    Potential Hazards
    • Dusts are formed whenever solid material is broken down into tiny particles. Dusts are often produced during sanding and grinding operations
    • Vapors are substances that are created when a solid or liquid material evaporates. Materials that evaporate easily at room temperature include paint thinner, solvents, and gasoline.
    • Fogs are vapors which have condensed into tiny airborne particles or droplets. An example of a hazardous fog would be an insect fogger used to rid industrial and residential areas of ticks and fleas.
    • Mists & Sprays are very small droplets of liquid material suspended in the air. They are often produced by spray and coating operations.
    • Gases are materials that are in the gaseous state at normal temperature (25oC) & pressure ( 1atm).
    • Smoke is made up of small particles produced by the incomplete combustion of any material that has carbon in it. Smoke is often produced during processes that require high heat or burning as part of the manufacturing process
    • Fumes can occur whenever a metal, plastic, or polymer is subjected to a high heat during such processes as welding and soldering operations

    Head Protection

    Potential Hazards
    • Impact to the Head: Falling or flying objects are a common cause of head injuries. Also, bumping head against fixed objects, such as exposed pipe or beams can cause head injuries.
    • Electrical Shocks: Accidents involving electricity result in electrical shocks and burns.
    Hard Hats

    Class G (formerly class A) are designed to:

    • Protect you from falling objects (general service)
    • Protect you from electrical shocks up to 2,200 volts

    Class E (formerly class B) are designed to:

    • Protect you from falling objects (utility service)
    • Protect you from electrical shocks up to 20,000 volts, (use extensively by electrical workers)

    Class C Hard Hats: are designed to:

    • Protect you from falling objects
    • DO NOT protect you from electrical shocks
    • DO NOT protect you from corrosive substances
    How Hard Hats Protect You:

    Hard hats protect you by providing the following features:

    • A rigid shell that resists and deflects blows to the head
    • A suspension system inside the hat that acts as a shock absorber
    • Some hats serve as an insulator against electrical shocks
    • Shields your scalp, face, neck, and shoulders against splashes, spills, and drips.
    • Some hard hats can be modified so you can add face shields, goggles, hoods, or hearing protection to them.
    Wearing Hard Hats

    Hard hats shall meet ANSI Z89.1 Class G or E.

    • Always wear your hard hat in areas where there are potential head hazards.
    • Adjust the suspension inside your hard hat
    • Inspect the shell for cracks, gouges, and dents and the suspension system for frayed or broken straps.
    • Never paint, scratch or drill "air holes" in your hard hat. You may apply reflective plastic tape if you must work at night.
    • Never carry personal belongings such as cigarettes, lighters, or pens in your hard hat.
    Care and Maintenance
    • Clean your hard hat at least once a month (or as needed) to remove oil, grease, chemicals, and sweat
    • You can clean by soaking it in a solution of mild soap and hot water for 5-10 minutes. Rinse with clear water, wipe, and let air dry.
    • Because sunlight and heat can damage the suspension of your hat, always store your hat in a clean, dry, and cool location.

    Hearing Protection

    Potential Hazards

    Causes of sensory hearing loss are:

    • Hereditary
    • Damage to fetus
    • Aging
    • Noise
    • Disease
    • Injury
    • Drugs

    Note: Sensory hearing loss CANNOT be corrected medically or surgically. It is permanent.

    Types of Hearing Protection Devices

    There are many types of hearing protection devices are available in the industry. It must be noted that they shall meet OSHA 29 CFR 1926.52; some devices in usage are:

    • Foam and PVC Earplugs
    • Earmuffs
    • Canal Caps
    Earplugs & Canal Caps

    The advantages of earplugs and canal caps are:

    • Small & lightweight
    • Comfortable in hot environments
    • Easily used with other safety equipment.

    The disadvantages of earplugs and canal caps are:

    • May work loose and require occasional refitting
    • Require specific fitting instructions
    • Are frequently soiled.
    Earmuffs

    The advantages of earmuffs are:

    • Easy for your employer to supervise the wearing of this device.
    • One size fits all.
    • Fits better for longer periods of time.

    The disadvantages of earmuffs are:

    • May fit tight on your head.
    • Uncomfortable in a warm environment.
    • Problems occur when used with other equipment.
    When Should You Wear a Hearing Protection Device?

    You should wear a hearing protection device whenever you are exposed to noise that is 85 decibels or greater for an 8-hour period of time.

    Maintenance of Hearing Protection Devices
    • Foam when not using your foam earplugs, store them in a clean, cool, dry place.
    • If your foam earplugs become soiled, torn or stiff, discard them and ask your supervisor or safety manager for a new pair.
    PVC Earplugs
    • When not using your PVC earplugs, store them in a clean, cool, dry place.
    • If your PVC earplugs become soiled, you can clean them with a mild solution of soap and water. Rinse, and then dry them with a soft towel.
    • If your PVC earplugs become torn or brittle, discard them and ask your supervisor or safety manager for a new pair Earplugs
    Earmuffs
    • When not using your earmuffs, store them in a clean, cool, dry place.
    • Always inspect your earmuffs for cracks around the foam cups. If your earmuffs are damaged, have them repaired immediately or ask your supervisor or safety manager for a new pair.

    Hand Protection

    Potential Hazards
    Traumatic Injuries
    • Tools and machines with sharp edges can cut your hands.
    • Staples, screwdrivers, nails, chisels, and stiff wire can puncture your hands.
    • Getting your hands caught in machinery can sprain, crush, or remove your hands and fingers.
    Contact Injuries

    Coming into contact with caustic or toxic chemicals, biological substances, electrical sources, or extremely cold or hot objects can irritate or burn your hands.

    WARNING: Toxic substances are poisonous substances that can be absorbed through your skin and enter your body.

    Repetitive Motion Injuries

    Whenever you repeat the same hand movement over a long period of time, you run the risk of repetitive motion problems. Repetitive motion problems often appear as numbness or tingling sensation accompanied by pain and the loss of gripping power in your hands

    Preventative Measures
    Housekeeping and Hygiene
    • Poorly maintained machinery, tools, sloppy work areas, and cluttered aisles all contribute to hand injuries.
    • Hand washing helps to remove germs and dirt from your hands. Clean hands are less susceptible to infection and other skin problems such as contact dermatitis.
    Gloves
    • Metal mesh gloves resist sharp edges and prevent cuts.
    • Leather gloves shield your hands from rough surfaces, spark and abrasive materials.
    • Vinyl and neoprene gloves protect your hands against toxic chemicals.
    • Rubber gloves protect you when working around electricity.
    • Padded cloth gloves protect your hands from sharp edges, slivers, dirt, and vibration.
    • Heat resistant/aluminized fabric gloves protect your hands from heat and flames.
    Wearing and using Gloves
    • Select gloves that fit.
    • Some gloves may be chemical specified and have a life expectancy. Discard them after the recommended time has expired.
    • Remove any rings, watches, or bracelets that might cut or tear your gloves.
    • Wash your hands before and after wearing your gloves.
    • Inspect your gloves before you use them.
    • Look for holes and cracks that might leak.
    • Replace gloves that are worn or torn.
    • After working with chemicals, hold your gloved hands under running water to rinse away any chemicals or dirt before removing the gloves
    • Wash cotton gloves as needed.
    • Avoid borrowing gloves. Gloves are personal protective equipment.
    • Store gloves right side out in a clean, cool, dry, ventilated area.
    • Never wear gloves around powered rotating equipment – drills, lathes, etc.
    • Barrier Creams - Water Repellent Creams are used to protect your hands from caustic chemicals.
    • Solvent-Repellent Creams are used to protect your hands from solvents, oils, and other organic chemicals.
    • Sunscreens protect your skin from the damaging effects of the sun.
    • Vanishing Creams protect your skin against mild acids, and make cleaning up easier.
    Warning:
    • Never substitute a barrier cream when you should use gloves.
    • Forearm Cuffs are used to protect your forearm.
    • Thumb Guards and Finger Cots protect only your thumb or fingers.
    • Mittens protect your hands while working around very cold or hot materials.
    • Hand Pads are often found in kitchens and laboratories.
    • Hand pads protect your hands while working around very hot materials.

    Foot Protection

    Potential Hazards
    Impact Injuries
    • At work, heavy objects can fall on or roll onto your feet. If you work around sharp objects, you can step on something sharp and puncture your foot.
    • Injuries from Spills and Splashes
    • Liquids such as acids, caustics, and molten metals can spill into your shoes and boots. These hazardous materials can cause chemical and heat burns.
    Compression Injuries

      Heavy machinery, equipment, and other objects can roll over your feet. The result of these types of accidents is often broken or crushed bones.

    Electrical Shocks

    If not protected, your feet can suffer from frostbite if you must work in an extremely cold environment. Extreme heat, on the other hand, can blister and burn your feet. Finally, extreme moisture in your shoes or boots can lead to fungal infections. Some examples include:

    • Accidents involving electricity can cause severe shocks and burns.
    • Extremes in Cold, Heat, and Moisture
    Slipping

    Oil, water, soaps, wax, and other chemicals can cause you to slip and fall.

    Housekeeping

    Poorly maintained machinery, tools, sloppy work areas, and cluttered aisles all contribute to foot injuries.

    Preventative Measures
    • Steel toe footwear protects your toes from falling objects and from being crushed.
    • Metatarsal footwear has special guards that run from your ankle to your toes and protect your entire foot.
    • Reinforced sole footwear has metal reinforcement that protects your foot from punctures.
    • Latex/Rubber footwear resists chemicals and provides extra traction on slippery surfaces
    • PVC footwear protects your feet against moisture and improves traction.
    • Butyl footwear protects against most ketones, aldehydes, alcohols, acids, salts, and alkalis.
    • Vinyl footwear resists solvents, acids, alkalis, salts, water, grease, and blood.
    • Nitride footwear resists animal fats, oils, and chemicals.
    • Electrostatic dissipating footwear conducts static electricity to floors that are grounded.
    • Electrical hazard footwear is insulated with tough rubber to prevent shocks and burns from electricity.
    • Disposable footwear includes shower slippers, clear polyethylene and nonwoven booties used in dust free work areas.
    Wearing and using Safety Footwear
    • Select and use the right safety footwear for the job you are going to be performing.
    • Safety footwear should meet or exceed the standards set by ANSI (ANSI Z41-1991).
    • Avoid safety footwear made of leather or cloth if you work around acids or caustics.
    • Select safety footwear that fit.
    • Inspect your safety footwear before you use them. Look for holes and racks that might leak
    • Replace safety footwear that are worn or torn.
    • After working with chemicals, hose your safety footwear with water to rinse away any chemicals or dirt before removing your footwear.
    • Avoid borrowing safety footwear. Safety footwear is Personal Protective Equipment.
    • Store footwear in a clean, cool, dry, ventilated area.
    ×
  • Scaffolding

    Scaffolding Safety

    Application

    • General
    • Scaffolding Terms
    • Construction Practices Common to all Scaffolds
    • Independent Tied Scaffolds
    • Mobile Tower Scaffolds
    • Truss Scaffolds
    • Slung Scaffolds
    • Drop Scaffolds
    • Scaffolding to Tanks & Vessels
    • System Scaffolding
    • Special Scaffolds
    • Portable Ladders

    Potential Hazards

    • Collapse of scaffolding
    • Falls from scaffolds
    • Falling objects off of scaffolds
    • Electrical shock

    Tube

    • Scaffolding tubing is nominally 2" diameter pipe free from cracks, surface flaws and other defects. Any scaffold pipe which requires a high degree of maintenance such as wire brushing or scraping shall be replaced. The ends of scaffolding pipe should be cut square with the axis of the tube. Painting of scaffold tubes is not recommended and should be only for identification purposes

    Fittings

    • Fittings shall be examined before use in order to ensure all moving parts are free and well lubricated for easy and positive movement. Acid baths are an acceptable method of maintenance prior to oiling the moving parts of fittings. Heat should not be applied during maintenance. All fittings used shall be in accordance with British Standard 1139: Specifications for Couplers and Fittings for Use in Tubular Scaffolding.

    Boards

    • Scaffold boards shall meet the following specifications:
    • 1-1/2" thick by 9-1/4" wide. Boards less than 1-1/2" thick are unacceptable. Boards greater than 1-1/2" thick shall not be wider than 9-1/4". All boards shall meet the requirements detailed in OSHA 1926. 451
    • Boards with splits are unacceptable.
    • Boards with knots larger than 2" are unacceptable.
    • Grain shall run the length of the board.
    • Warped boards are unacceptable.
    • Board ends must be bound with hoop irons.
    • Looking at the edge of a board, not more than half of the depth shall be knot wood.
    • Boards shall not be painted or treated in any way that may conceal defects. Ends may be painted for identification purposes.
    • Boards shall not have oil, grease or any other liquid spilled on them to where a fire or slipping hazard could be created. These boards shall be replaced.
    • Notched boards shall be cut square and rebounded with hoop irons before use.
    • Boards after use should be cleaned, stacked flat and raised above the ground height by cross battens for storage.

    Housekeeping

    • Scaffolding and the area around scaffolding is to be maintained in a clean and orderly fashion. Special attention is required to ensure that blasting material (grit) does not build up on scaffold boards.

    Scaffolding Terms for Tubular Members

    • Board Bearer (Intermediate Transom): A tube spanning across ledgers between transoms to support a work platform.
    • Brace: A tube incorporated diagonally across two or more members in a scaffold and fixed to them in order to ensure stability.
    • Guardrail (Also wrongly known as Handrail): A tube incorporated in a structure to prevent the fall of a person from a platform or access way. The tube is to be 36" - 45" above the deck.
    • Handrail: Tube used on stairs before permanent handrails, banisters, etc., are fitted to prevent the fall of a person.
    • Ledger: A tube spanning horizontally and tying a scaffold longitudinally. It may also act as a support for board bearers or transoms.
    • Midrail: A tube incorporated in a structure midway between the guardrail and deck.
    • Puncheon: A vertical tube supported otherwise than upon the ground or abase plate.
    • Raker: An inclined load-bearing tube having a bearing on the ground or on an adjacent structure.
    • Reveal Tie: A tube which is jacked or wedged between two opposing surfaces, e.g. a window opening (reveal), or to assist in tying a scaffold to a building or structural support beams.
    • Standard (Upright): A tube used as a column or vertical in the construction of a scaffold, and transmitting a load to the grounds deck or grating via a base plate and sole plate.
    • Tie: A tube used to connect a scaffold to a rigid anchorage.
    • Transom: A tube spanning across ledgers to tie a scaffold transversely, which may also support a working platform.

    General Terms

    • Base Plate: A metal plate with a spigot for distributing the load from a standard, rakes, or load bearing tube. Should be used in conjunction with a sole plate when used with a standard.
    • Bay: The space between two adjacent standards along the face of a scaffold.
    • Board: A softwood board used to provide access, a working platform, and protective components such as toe boards.
    • Buttress: A well braced tubular structure erected against an existing scaffolding structure to strengthen it.
    • Castor: A swivelling wheel with a locking device secured to the base of a vertical member for the purpose of mobilizing the scaffolding.
    • Clip: Used to fix a board to a scaffold tube.
    • Column Box-Tie: Two-way tie secured to a vertical column with tubes forming a 'box' around the column.
    • Coupler: A component used to fix scaffold tubing together.
    • Decking: A close boarded scaffold platform.
    • Extension Bracket: A bracket secured to a standard to enable boards (usually two) to be placed between the inner standards of an independent scaffold and a wall or structure. Generally not used with tube and clip scaffolding, but for framework fitting.
    • Hanging Wire: Wire rope used for suspending and anchoring slung scaffolds (minimum diameter 3/8 inches).
    • Hoop Iron: Metal band fitted to the ends of board to prevent splitting.
    • Junction: The intersection of a series of tubes.
    • Ledger Bracing: Tubes secured diagonally between lifts, from ledger to ledger or standard to standard in order to ensure stability.
    • Lift: The height from the ground or deck to the lowest ledger, or the vertical distance between two adjacent ledgers.
    • Longitudinal Bracing (Face or Facade Bracing): Tubes secured diagonally across the face of a scaffold to ensure stability.
    • Parallel Coupler: Short tube secured longitudinally across an end to end joint in tubing, to strengthen the joint. Not to be used instead of a joint or sleeve in uprights.
    • Scaffold Lashing: 3/8" diameter rope or 1/4" wire used for lashing ladders, boards, etc. Not to be used for suspending or anchoring scaffolds, or for lifting operations.
    • Sole Plate (Spreader): A timber or other member of adequate size and suitable quality used to distribute the load from the base plate over an area of ground, deck, or grating. To extend a maximum of 2' either side of the upright.
    • Stiles: Vertical members of a ladder.
    • System Scaffolding (Unit formwork, Kwikstage, or Frame Scaffolding): The term used to describe scaffolding is composed wholly or partly of purpose made frames or units.
    • Toeboard (Kick Board): A board positioned along the edge of a platform in order to prevent per-sons, tools, and materials falling from the platform.
    • Two-way Tie: A tie which prevents movement of the scaffolding both to and from the building or structure to which it is secured.
    • Unit Beam (Truss): A purpose made lattice beam incorporated into a scaffold structure to form a bridge where openings are necessary. These can be bolted or jointed together.
    • Work Stage (Staging): Purpose made decking for use on towers, trestles, roof trusses, or frames.
    • Suspension Scaffold: A two-point suspension scaffold (swinging scaffold), the platform of which is supported by hangers at two points, is suspended from overhead supports so as to permit the raising or lowering of the platform to the desired working position by hoisting machines.

    Construction Practices Common to all Scaffolds

    • Protective equipment
    • Use of safety Harness
    • Foundations
    • Standards
    • Ledgers
    • Decking
    • Guardrails & Toe boards
    • Access
    • Scaffold covers
    • Incomplete scaffolding
    • Inspections
    • Base
    • Intermediate lifts
    • Working lift
    • Miscellaneous
    • Independent Tied Scaffolds
    • An independent tied scaffold consists of a double row of standards connected together longitudinally with ledgers and with transoms at right angles to the ledger. Braces and ties are essential for stability. It is the most common form of access scaffolding and is divided into three groups.

    Group Workload Use

    • Light duty, Painting and cleaning, 15lbs/ft2
    • General duty , Material being deposited on work platform, 37bs/ft2
    • Heavy duty , Heavy material being deposited on work
    • platform, 60 lbs/ft2

    For General Requirements

    • Mobile Tower Scaffolds
    • Design, loading and dimensions
    • For use internally
    • For use externally
    • Foundations
    • Standards
    • Ledgers and transoms
    • Ties
    • Guardrails and Mid rails
    • Decking
    • Access
    • Operation
    • Limitations
    • Truss Scaffolds
    • A truss scaffold is cantilevered out from a building or structure and used where it is impractical to erect conventional scaffolding based upon the ground or another surface. It is a form of light independent tied scaffold which is entirely dependent upon the building or structure for support and stability.
    ×
  • Smoking

    Smoking

    Introduction

    • Medical evidence indicates tobacco smoke is a significant health hazard to both the smoker and the non-smoker, and we seek to provide a healthy workplace for all of our employees.
    • To address these health concerns and promote a healthful working environment, JOS has decided to ban smoking except in designated areas of all company owned/ concession /rented areas, not available to the general public where we conduct business, and all company-owned or leased vehicles.
    • All persons on the premises (JOS) - including contract workers and visitors- are expected to comply with the smoking regulations detailed in this policy.
    • We will impose no higher standard on the general public or on employees engaged in personal pursuits that is imposed by either the law or society.
    • Therefore, Company owned/ leased/rented areas that are available to the general public or areas devoted primarily to employee recreation are excluded from area (s) which we can realistically declare smoke free.
    • Smoking shall be permitted only in designated rooms and areas that are specifically designed to eliminate passive smoker; that is all air exhausted to the outside of the building and/or the smoke contaminated air is not re-circulated to the A/C unit.
    • This includes owned/leased areas devoted primarily to employee recreation.
    • A sign stating “Smoking Permitted” must be displayed inside building smoking areas.
    • The absence of such sign means “No Smoking”.

    No Smoking Areas

    • Any enclosed space within the buildings, except as noted in paragraph S7.1.2. For example all work areas, private offices and common areas.
    • Any outside areas where fire or safety hazards exist and areas within 35 feet of hydrocarbon or chemical storage areas will be designated as no smoking areas.

    Smoking Areas

    • Smoking will only be permitted outside the Buildings at ground level and within open-air courtyards or in designated Building smoking rooms meeting the criteria of section S7.0 POLICY paragraph 4.
    • Smoking shall be permitted in Company concession Cabins at the discretion of the occupants.
    • JOS Vehicles- no smoking
    • Signs- appropriate signs will be displayed in all no smoking areas.
    ×
  • Waste Management

    Waste Management

    What is waste?

    Materials that are no longer usable because of:

    • decay
    • corrosion
    • leakage
    • contamination
    • expired
    • broken
    • spilled
    • Materials that are the residue of an activity
    • and/or production process
    What is Waste Management?

    A comprehensive system that will enable JOS to:

    • Minimize waste generation.
    • Ensure that all waste generated is disposed of in a safe, timely, efficient, cost effective and compliance with safety and all environment policies and regulations.
    Policies & Regulations
    • Environmental Management:
      • Environmental Impact Assessment Libyan Gov’t Act no. XXXXXX on Environmental Management
      • Those who damage or pollute the environment shall pay compensation to those whose rights have been violated
      • Intentional violations are punishable by up to 10-15 years in prison and/or Rp 500MM-750MM
      • Businesses which propose business activities must study the significant environmental impacts of the proposed activity as part of the decision making process
      • An analysis of environmental impacts constitutes part of the feasibility study of business plans and/or plans of activities
    • Hazardous & toxic waste (B3 waste) definition :
      • any waste containing dangerous and/or toxic material which may damage the living environment and/or endanger human health
    • Treatment of B3 Waste aim :
      • To eliminate or reduce the hazardous and toxic properties of B3 waste so as not endanger human health and the environment
      • Every person and corporation is prohibited to dispose of B3 waste directly into water, soil and air
      • Enterprises carrying out collecting, transportation or processing shall acquire the following permits
      • Producer, collector, transporter and processor of B3 waste shall be responsible for emergency response and pollution of the environment as a result of emission or spilling of B3 waste
      • Drilling mud and cuttings and oil bottom sludge is categorized as B3 waste
      • Characteristic test of B3 waste consist of : explosive, burnable, reactive, toxic, infectious and corrosive
    Waste Minimization
    Effort to minimize waste generation are made from stages:
    • Planning
    • Procurement
    • Handling and Transportation
    • Storage
    • Usage
    Planning:

    Evaluate waste minimization options, by reviewing opportunities for:

    • Reduce or eliminate waste, volume or toxicity
    • Recycling
    • Reclaiming
    • Other treatment
    • Take a pilot test for evaluation
    • Plan and encourage lifecycle assessment in the development of every process to limit waste generation, discharges and emissions
    Procurement Process:
    • Carefully estimate the amount of required materials to avoid excess material
    • Minimize the variety of materials ordered
    • Minimize surplus inventory and potential waste
    • Negotiate with suppliers to return the excess materials and/or containers
    • Select low-volume, low toxicity products whenever feasible
    Handling and Transportation:

    Proper handling and transportation are required to minimize waste generation, include physical check on:

    • Delivery Condition
    • Proper Packaging
    • Marking and Labeling
    • MSDS
    • Proper Loading / Unloading
    • Transportation Method
    Storage:
    • Proper storage method
    • Pre-check on delivery conditions (quality, quantity, packaging, MSDS, documentation)
    • Preparation of space layout design
    • Foundation and containment
    • Proper materials placement
    • Regular physical check and inventory stock
    Usage:

    Use up all materials on location to minimize waste generation, includes:

    • Optimization of consumption
    • Sufficient material usage control
    • Proper tools and proper handling
    • Reuse in other location
    Waste Identification and Handling
    • Categorization
    • Volume estimation
    • Segregation
    • Temporary storage and handling
    • Administration
    • Documentation
    • Waste code
    • Performance metrics
    Waste Categorization
    • Hazardous waste
    • Non-Hazardous waste:
      • Non-Hazardous industrial and oil & gas field
      • Domestic waste
    What makes a waste Hazardous?
    • Declared by its generator
    • Included in the hazardous wastes list in Libyan Government legislation XXXXXXXX
    • Contains one or more of following features:
      • Explosive
      • Flammable
      • Reactive
      • Toxic
      • Infectious
      • Corrosive
    • Any mixtures of hazardous wastes with other materials
    • Unknown waste
    Typical Hazardous wastes in JOS's Operations
    • Used battery
    • Used lubricant
    • Used chemical (corrosive / poison)
    • Sludge
    • Drilling mud
    • Drilling cutting
    How to handle unkown waste materials?
    • Treat As Hazardous Waste
    • Employees At The Point Where The Container Originated Are Responsible For Identifying The Material
    • Waste Which Cannot Be Identified Must Be Sent To A Lab To Be Analized
    • Mixture Of Hazardous And Non-Hazardous Wastes In One Container Results In Whole Container Being Classified As Hazardous Waste
    • Non-Hazardous Industrial and Oil & Gas ield waste
    • Typically Includes ONLY Wastes Associated With Industrial Processes
    • Cannot Be Sent To A Municipal Waste Landfill
    • Should Not Be Mixed With Domestic Waste Such As Garbage Or Construction Waste
    • Example Of Non-Hazardous Industrial Waste :
      • Assort. Used Filters (Exclude Oil/Fuel filters)
      • Used abrasive materials, rust, etc.
      • Sump sludge
      • Unused non-hazardous chemicals and supplies
    Examples of Non-Hazardous Oilfield waste
    • Produced sand and other well solids
    • Excess cement slurries and cement cutting
    Domestic Waste
    • Normal, everyday garbage / waste generated at cafetarias (galleys), office facilities, and living quarters
    • Packaging wastes
    • Volume Estimation on Site: To make proper and accurate calculation on further transportation, budgeting, storing and other requirements
    Types of waste based on volume measurement
    • Liquid
      • Measured by volume
    • Semi Liquid
      • Measured by volume or weight
    • Solid
      • Measured by weight
    • Waste Segregation
    • Proper waste segregation at the point of origin is critical to the whole waste management chain
    • Each location is responsible for organizing space and containers, and develop a system to assure proper waste segregation
    • All waste shall be segregated according to their general physical and chemical characteristics
    • Prior to disposal, waste must be segregated into:
      • Hazardous waste: Solid, Liquid and Gas.
      • Non – hazardous waste >> Solid: bio-degradable- wood/paper- glass - metal - rubber/plastic- liquid
    Temporary Storage & Handling Hazardous Waste:
    • stored max 90 days from 1st drop
    Stored in proper warehouse:
    • Flood-free
    • Geologically stable
    • Accommodate waste characteristic and procedure to mitigate pollution
    • Stored separately from other waste
    • Placed in 15-55 gallon (60-220 liter) polypropylene (plastic) or drums exclusively for a specific hazardous waste
    • Temporary Storage & Handling
    Non-hazardous Industrial Oil & Gas Field Waste:
    • Should be collected, accumulated and stored in separate containers
    • Temporary Storage & Handling
    • Domestic waste:
      • Accumulated in trash baskets or bins used exclusively for this category
      • Regular trash containers equipped with lids or nets to avoid waste escape during transportation or storage
    Waste Administration:
    • All waste materials must be properly identified, with marking and labels
    • All hazardous waste packages must have valid MSDS in its shipment
    • All undefined waste will be returned to its point of origin for identification
    • Documentation
    Waste Manifest required for its shipment shall include:
    • Type, characteristic, quantity and date of 1st drop of waste in the container
    • Type, characteristic, quantity and time of delivery
    • Name of transporter
    Waste Code:
    • Shall comply with Libyan Regulation no. XXXXXXXXXXX
    Performance Metrics

    Metrics which will apply should consider performance measures, such as:

    • Percentage of waste shipments from offshore to shore base which conform to waste segregation guidelines
    • Reduction in waste volumes generated
    • Percentage of wastes recycled
    • Number of waste management inspections
    • Percentage of employees undergoing waste management training
    Waste Disposal

    Waste cannot be legally disposed of unless it has been handled according to the following procedures:

    • Approval
    • Packaging
    • Handling and Transportation Method
    • Disposal Alternatives
    Approval
    • EGA approved transportation and disposal facility for Hazardous Waste.
    Packaging

    Must be packed properly to prevent any leakage/ damage during transportation and handling. Types of packaging usually used are:

    • Metal: marine portable tanks, cutting boxes
    • Plastic: plastic drums, trash bags, rice sacks
    • Wood: wooden boxes, plywood boxes
    Hazardous Waste Packaging
    • Good quality containers, constructed to prevent leaking during shipment or due to changes in temperature, humidity, pressure or vibration
    • Packaging (include closures) must be resistant to chemical or other actions of wastes
    • Materials of container must not contain substances may react with the contents
    Handling and Transportation Method
    • Waste handling is series of operations including the collecting, segregating, recording, packaging, labeling and transporting of waste
    Hazardous Waste Labeling
    • As soon as the FIRST DROP of hazardous waste is placed in a container, a label should be attached to the container
    The Hazardous Waste Label should include the following:
    • Waste name and type of hazard
    • Accumulation date (date of 1st drop of waste)
    Waste Transportation
    • Process of moving waste from the generator to the collector and/or to the processor, including to the place of final disposal using transportation facilities
    • Waste is to be transported by land and/or sea
    Transporting Hazardous Waste
    • Performed by an EGA approved hazardous waste Transportation Company
    • Accompanied with complete waste manifest
    • Shall be carried out by special transportation facilities, which meet both transportation requirements and procedures as stipulated in goverment regulations
    Disposal Alternatives
    • Re-use
    • Recycle / recovery
    • Return to vendor / manufacturer
    • Donate to Local Authority
    • Dispose at Waste Management Company
    • Send to Junk Dealer / Reclaimer
    • On-shore disposal (burn, landfill)
    • Return to Vendor or Manufacturer:
      • Unused chemical
      • Bulk containers
      • Used batteries
      • Unused paints
      • drums
      • Use contract provisions wherever possible to require takeback
    • Dispose at Waste Management Company :
      • Disposal of Hazardous waste
      • Disposal must be at facilities permitted under Libyan Goverment Regulation XXXXXXXXXXX
      • All requirements on packing, labeling, transporting, etc should be fulfilled
    • Send to Junk Dealer (Reclaimer) :
      • Steel scrap
      • Junk drums
      • Plastic scrap
      • Soft drink cans
      • Glass
    ×

40+ Completed Projects

Jabel Oilfield Services is a well established Leader in Libyan Oilfield Industry, we do not only focus on completing our projects in a timely manner; but our core strategy relies in establishing an organization where our workforce will like to work while providing best of their experties. Completion of following projects is result of our such carefully crafted strategies:

List of Completed Projects

  • Construct new work shop (Hanger) at UMM EL FOROD plant / Bida field.
  • Construct handrail at EL_DOR / Bida field.
  • Construct handrail at EL-KATLA Bida field.
  • Construct handrail at EL-HAMADA field.
  • Replacement of Oil Line for Well nos. C-51, C-137, C-1 at Sarir field.
  • Replacement of water-de saltier lines at MESLA.
  • Carried out water drainage at EL-NAFORA.
  • Cleaning of set of plants at SARIR.
  • Construct 6" dia. water Lines at plant no. (686-6112-679) for water injection.
  • Construct Oil Well 4" dia. At plant No. 1-6-9.
  • Carried out sand cleaning inside the Accommodation area at EL-NAFORA.
  • Field cutting of some parts of trees.
  • Construct handrail for football sports ground.
  • Carry out sand cleaning on wells at MAJD field.
  • Construct sand walls at MAJD field.
  • Construct steel handrail at MAJD field.
  • Construct Mobile Accom. building roof together with Electrical/ water & sewage connection.
  • Construct water tanks inside Accommodation area at MAJD field.
  • Carried out complete grounding for swimming pool.
  • Construct Aluminum doors at MESLA filed.
  • Modification of Toilets at Guest House.
  • Construct 500 pipe supports (RAKS) at SARIR field.
  • Construct new pipe connection, 3" dia. For water supply & connected to wells no. 151,152, at SARIR field.
  • Construct cable concrete channel at SARIR field.
  • Maintenance of Nine Accommodation building at SARIR field.
  • Construct handrail for Accommodation & Industrial zones at SARIR field.
  • Supply & install Generator, 500 KVA for SARIR Refinery.
  • Construct refrigerator at MAJD field
  • Construct steel handrail for Accommodation area at MAJD field.
  • Replacement of 6" oil line at HH43 MESLA field.
  • Replacement of Loop extension on wells no. HH 43, HH11, HH.
  • Construct wall at MESLA field.
  • Construct set of Concrete foundation at MESLA field.
  • Construct 300 pieces of pipe supports at MESLA field.
  • Execution of MESLA field Airstrip.
  • Supply and construction of 4 Hangers – NAFORA Oil Field and Tobruk
  • Manpower Supply & Service Contracts with Waha Oil Company (R-124 ).
  • High line project - Waha oil company south Defa / Faregh
  • Contract number 35/2010 Harouge Oil Operations
  • 10'' trunk line at 5 J area (Waha field) waha oil company

Note: If execution and hand over certificates are required for a specific project then JOS can provide these documents based on formal request from client.

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jabel oilfield services is focused on providing quality-oriented solutions to its clients

jabel oilfield services is focused on providing quality-oriented solutions to its clients

Contact us

Please do not hesitate to contact us for any business enquiries.

Contact us
Head Office at Tripoli, Libya

Tel: +218-21-483-0594
Tel: +218-21-484-3226
Fax: +218-21-361-3798
Near to British Council, Seyahiya, Tripoli - Libya.


Benghazi Branch

Tel: +218-61-224-1340


Rajab Elborgi
Chairman / General Manager
elborgi@joslibya.com
Waheed Bassili
Director
bassili@joslibya.com

Email: info@joslibya.com
Website: www.joslibya.com


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